ten online – Potere Fotografico http://poterefotografico.com/ Sat, 26 Mar 2022 16:27:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://poterefotografico.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-28.png ten online – Potere Fotografico http://poterefotografico.com/ 32 32 Home Photography Ideas: Dancing Painting, Using Flash Magic https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-dancing-painting-using-flash-magic/ Fri, 15 May 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-dancing-painting-using-flash-magic/ Watch the video: Home Photography Ideas – Sparkling Bokeh Photos In photography, sometimes the joy comes from creating a beautiful image. At other times, the end result is more of an added bonus, and it’s rather the process behind the image that is the happy part. This project is definitely part of this last camp. […]]]>


Watch the video: Home Photography Ideas – Sparkling Bokeh Photos

In photography, sometimes the joy comes from creating a beautiful image. At other times, the end result is more of an added bonus, and it’s rather the process behind the image that is the happy part.

This project is definitely part of this last camp. Sure, it can make for some vibrant photos, but the technique is just as compelling. It’s because here we make painting dance! To do this, place drops of paint on a speaker, then play a song at a high volume.

• ten best online photography courses

When the speaker expels air, the paint jumps to the beat. There is something extremely appealing about capturing music in this visual way. Of course, the speaker is just a way to create vibrations, the music is a bit secondary.

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

However, you will get variations between different songs depending on the beat. Thus, the choice of music gives character to the shot, and you will get different patterns and movements of the sound of Beethoven, or James Brown, or Daft Punk. In a way, it’s music in the form of a painting.

It also happens incredibly quickly, so we have to prepare to capture the high speed action. It involves speed of light and an understanding of flash duration. Simply put, the flash duration is the time that the flash burst takes from start to finish.

Turning in a dark room, we use the incredibly fast duration of the speed of light to freeze the movement of the painting. In this way, the duration of the flash effectively becomes the shutter speed. Here’s how this exciting technique is performed …

How to make painting dance

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

01 Speaker
We need a loud enough speaker with lots of bass to blow our paint up into the air. We used the subwoofer of a TV sound bar, placed on the side and connected to our phone via bluetooth. We place our camera on a tripod in front of the speaker.

02 Stretch film and paint
The paint drops are carefully placed on a taut piece of cling film that has been stretched over the speaker. After a few seconds of frantic hopping, the different colors will blend into a muddy green, so we need to refresh the paint and the cling film after a few strokes.

03 black background
The black side of a reflector acts as a dark backdrop for our scene. It is placed far enough away that the flash does not spill over it. Paint can cause a lot of damage, so it’s a good idea to protect floors and surfaces by covering them. Also consider wearing old clothes.

04 Close-up lens
We used a macro lens for this, but you don’t necessarily need it. Our paintings here covered an area of ​​about 15 cm in diameter, which is not necessarily macro territory. Any long lens that lets you shoot close-up will do. A low camera angle will emphasize the height of the jump painting.

05 Darkroom
We need to keep ambient light to a minimum – the brighter the room, the greater the risk of motion blur. By canceling out ambient light to near darkness, we can ensure that it plays a minimal role in our exposure, allowing us to use very fast flash durations to freeze the action.

06 Lighting
Our single speed light is placed on a stand to the left of the paintings, with a silver reflector held in front to reflect some of the light back into the shadows. Our flash is set to manual, for better control, and with a power of 1/32. It is pulled wirelessly with a trigger and a receiver.

Lightning dance

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

01 Manual shooting

Our camera is in manual using the following settings: 1/200 sec, f / 32, ISO1000. The narrow aperture means we get a wider focus plane, with a greater depth of field, which is especially useful here as we can’t know exactly where the paint will bounce.

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

02 Pre-focus on a spot

Accurate focus is essential in close-up photography, but it’s impossible to focus when the painting is in motion, so we have to pre-focus on the most likely spot beforehand. Set the lens to manual focus and use Live View to focus on the center of the still painting. We use a macro lens for best results, but long lenses can do the trick.

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

03 Use low flash power

A lower flash output setting will give us a shorter flash. At full power our Yongnuo YN-560 IV has a flash duration of around 1/300 s, but at 1/32 power this changes to a much more efficient 1/7000 s (approx.). For faster flash times, reduce the power of the Speedlite.

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

04 Mix the paints

We used a combination of water based paints. This is important – if the paint is too viscous it won’t bounce back, but if it’s too thin it might spill all over the place. Experiment by mixing the paint with water until you reach the correct thickness.

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

05 Turn up the bass

Part of the fun here is discovering how different music affects the movement of the painting. A tune with a fast pace can work well. Whichever genre you choose, crank your speaker bass setting to the max – it makes a huge difference in how powerful the rhythm is.

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

06 Shot timing

The time you use while shooting is crucial. It can be difficult to predict the best time to press the shutter button, so after turning on the music, trigger a series of images as quickly as your flash allows. After a while the paints will mix, so refresh them to try again.

Control colors in Photoshop

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

01 Store the backdrop

First, enhance the colors and add oomph by increasing the saturation and contrast. If there are unwanted reflections on the cling film, grab the brush tool and paint with black on it. You can use the Burn tool set to Range: Shadows to darken the parts that appear messy.

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

02 Change shade

It’s easy to change colors completely using the Hue / Saturation control. Click the “Create Adjustment Layer” icon in the Layers panel and choose Hue / Saturation. The settings will appear in the Properties panel. Just drag the Hue slider left or right to skew the colors.

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

03 Change individual colors

In Hue / Saturation mode, you can also target individual color ranges. Click the main drop-down menu to choose a range or grab the hand tool in settings, hold Cmd / Ctrl, and drag across colors in the image. For other color adjustments, try using the Selective Colors adjustment layer.

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The best flash: the best strobe units for Canon, Nikon and more cameras
Home Photography Ideas To Keep You Creative While Locked Out


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Home Photography Ideas: Sparkling Bokeh Photos in Your Living Room https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-sparkling-bokeh-photos-in-your-living-room/ Tue, 12 May 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-sparkling-bokeh-photos-in-your-living-room/ Watch Video: Home Photography Ideas – Sparkling Bokeh Photos Shooting bubbles is a great way to experiment with your camera and get some fun and creative shots. However, rather than shooting outdoors and dealing with the elements, we’ll be using a simple indoor setup and a fast lens to capture inspiring images. We set up […]]]>

Watch Video: Home Photography Ideas – Sparkling Bokeh Photos

Shooting bubbles is a great way to experiment with your camera and get some fun and creative shots. However, rather than shooting outdoors and dealing with the elements, we’ll be using a simple indoor setup and a fast lens to capture inspiring images.

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Home Photography Ideas: Capture David Hockney-Worthy Montage Portraits https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-capture-david-hockney-worthy-montage-portraits/ https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-capture-david-hockney-worthy-montage-portraits/#respond Mon, 11 May 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-capture-david-hockney-worthy-montage-portraits/ Watch the video: Home Photography Ideas – David Hockney Portrait Montages In the 1980s, artist David Hockney began assembling Polaroids into collages that showed a subject from multiple angles. Hockney’s “Joiners” captured the public imagination and made him a household name. Since then, the technique has been imitated a lot, to the point of becoming […]]]>


Watch the video: Home Photography Ideas – David Hockney Portrait Montages

In the 1980s, artist David Hockney began assembling Polaroids into collages that showed a subject from multiple angles. Hockney’s “Joiners” captured the public imagination and made him a household name.

Since then, the technique has been imitated a lot, to the point of becoming almost an old hat. There’s even an online app called Hockneyizer, which will do all the work for you, but that’s about as far away from the original spirit of the idea as possible!

If you experiment with this technique, however, you will find that it still contains life – in the unusual perspective it creates and the amazing effect it has on an everyday scene.

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(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

To begin with, we take a series of portraits taken from different angles, some cropped and some looser. Variety is a good thing here, as subtle differences between the frames will help distinguish them. And then from there we have two options.

We can either organize our collage in Photoshop, putting the images together and then adding shadows to simulate real photographs, or instead we can take the old-fashioned approach by printing the photos and physically arranging them at the same time. hand.

We’ll explain both methods here, and you’ll be able to see the differences in each approach and what gives your preferred results …

How to photograph your “carpenters”

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

01 Camera settings
These are usually our original exposure settings for outdoor portraits: manual mode, shutter speed 1/250 sec, aperture f / 4, Auto ISO. This way the shutter speed will be fast enough to freeze the action and the large aperture will blur the background.

02 Move
Take a series of facial shots; you will need at least 20. Move slightly
as you shoot to capture different angles. Try to add variety with your focal point; maybe focus on the nearest eye in one image and the farthest eye in the next.

03 Subject movement
In addition to moving your camera’s position, have your subject move between images. Shoot them directly, try to capture their profile, or position them at 45 degrees. For a strong shape to your collage, keep the neckline off the clothes.

04 White wall
You can try the technique on any scene, but if you want to create the kind of strong head shape shown in our example, a simple clean background will work best because it helps define the shape of the face. We used a plain white exterior wall here.

05 Soft light
We shot our series of portraits outdoors on a cloudy day. Being soft and diffused, this type of light is flattering for portraits and perfect for the Joiner technique, as it means the light remains even and consistent across the different frames.

06 Zoom lens
You’ll want to vary the crops as you shoot, with tight frames on different parts of the face and others farther away. A zoom lens will help you shoot this way. At longer focal lengths, hold the camera while shooting to avoid shaking.

Method 1: digital collage by David Hockney

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

01 Convert all images to mono

In Adobe Bridge, right click on an image and “Open in Camera Raw”, then convert it to mono. Click on Done. Right-click the image, choose Develop Settings> Copy Settings. Select the other files, right-click, and select Develop Settings> Paste Settings.

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

02 Copy and paste

Open an image, use the Rectangular Marquee Tool to select a part, then Ctrl + C to copy. Go to File> New and create a new A3 document with a white background. Paste in the selection. In the Layers panel, right-click the layer and select Convert to Smart Object.

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

03 Resize and position

Select the Move tool, check Show transform controls and Automatically select layer in its options. Move the part roughly into position and click on the corner of the box if you need to resize (hold down Shift). Open another image, select a part, paste it and position it again.

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

04 Create shadows

Finally, we will add shadows. Double click on any layer to open the layer styles box. Highlight Drop Shadow, then adjust the settings to change the size and position of the shadow. Once done, hold Alt and drag the drop shadow effect from one layer to another to copy it.

Method 2: The old-fashioned approach

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

01 Make impressions

We used a consumer printer to make our set of 6×4 prints – some vertical, some horizontal – and then laid them out on a white table. Like in Photoshop, you can play around with the positions and move the prints up or down, but it feels more authentic to do it by hand, and the results are more random.

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(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

02 Set up a copy table

For even illumination, place two lamps of equal wattage on either side of the artwork at a 45-degree angle. Set up a tripod directly above the prints and tilt your camera down. Some tripods allow the center column to be reversed so that the camera is facing down, which can help.

• The best tripods

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

03 shoot the footprints

Check for hot spots and reflections on the prints and adjust the position of the lights if necessary. Make sure that the tripod legs do not cast shadows on the print. Set your camera to aperture priority at f / 8, at its ISO base, then take your photo. You can now correct any color cast or convert to mono in Photoshop.

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Home Photography Ideas: Motion Blur Portrait https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-motion-blur-portrait/ https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-motion-blur-portrait/#respond Thu, 07 May 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-motion-blur-portrait/ Watch the video: Home Photography Ideas – Motion Blur Portrait Motion blur is one of the most exciting visual effects available to photographers. This magical combination of crisp and soft detail never fails to impress – and, as any landscape photographer knows, it does wonders for photographing moving water or clouds. This is not something […]]]>


Watch the video: Home Photography Ideas – Motion Blur Portrait

Motion blur is one of the most exciting visual effects available to photographers. This magical combination of crisp and soft detail never fails to impress – and, as any landscape photographer knows, it does wonders for photographing moving water or clouds.

This is not something normally associated with portraits, however, where the goal is usually to freeze the action. However, sometimes a little motion blur can be put to good use in your photos of people.

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The basic technique here is very simple. We need our subject to remain perfectly still while the surrounding objects are in motion. If we use a shutter speed that is slightly longer than normal, the movement is recorded as a blur. A patterned umbrella works perfectly; gently twirled, it creates beautiful circular streaks of color.

This can be a bit of a balancing act, because the longer the exposure, the harder it is for our subject to stay completely still.

For a close-up, a shutter speed of around 1/10 of a second is about as slow as it gets. At shutter speeds like this motion is blurry, but in addition to subject movement there is also a risk of camera shake. A tripod is useful, but we can also improve our success rate by using the continuous drive mode at high speed.

We’ll walk you through how to set up your camera and also give you some more ideas on how you can enhance your portraits with beautiful blurry movements.

Blur a moving background

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

01 Slow down

Mount your camera on a tripod and set it to shutter priority mode. Reduce the shutter speed to about 1/10 of a second, then lower the ISO as low as possible – ISO100 is probably the lowest, but if you have a LOW setting, use it.

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

02 Improve your success rate

This technique can be random. You’re bound to end up with a few smooth shots, but you can increase your chances of getting a perfectly sharp one by using the high-speed continuous drive mode and taking burst shots.

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

03 Ask the subject

Place your subject in the shade or back to the sun and have them lean against something solid to help them stay still. If you have one, use a reflector to bounce the light off the face.

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

04 Play statues

With everything in place, it’s all about you to stay as still as possible while spinning the umbrella around. Take bursts of photos, then examine your photos and zoom in closely to make sure the eyes are in sharp focus. While a portrait lens is usually the best choice for portraits, a standard zoom can be useful for framing your subject while holding up a reflector.

4 ideas for portraits in motion blur

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

01 Include passers-by

Ask the subject to remain as still as possible while someone walks in the background, which can create an atmosphere of isolation or loneliness. It is easier for your subject to stay still if they are sitting or leaning against something.

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

02 A ghostly head

Rather than moving other parts of the scene, why not have your subject move part of their body while keeping the rest still. Whipping your head side to side creates a rather unsettling ghostly portrayal. Black and white helps to simplify the image.

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

03 Move the limbs

Have your subject move their hands, limbs, or other body parts as you shoot. The movement creates an interesting mix of crisp and soft details. It can also work well for action or sports photography giving a sense of speed and action.

(Image credit: James Paterson / Digital Camera World)

04 Blur the clouds

If the subject is smaller in the frame, you can often get by with a longer exposure time. Here, a 30-second exposure results in motion blur in the clouds and water. We used a 10-speed ND filter to make the extra long shutter speed possible.

Read more:

The best camera for portraits: perfect cameras and lenses for portraits
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The best reflectors for photography: control your lighting with ease!
How to take portrait photography: essential and practical portrait tips


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Home photography ideas: shoot macro without a macro lens, using an inversion ring https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-shoot-macro-without-a-macro-lens-using-an-inversion-ring/ Thu, 07 May 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-shoot-macro-without-a-macro-lens-using-an-inversion-ring/ Reversal rings are seemingly obscure accessories for new photographers, but they offer a superb level of added functionality for your existing lenses – they turn a normal lens into a macro lens! By attaching a reversing ring to the filter thread of a standard or moderate wide lens, it can then be mounted on a […]]]>

Reversal rings are seemingly obscure accessories for new photographers, but they offer a superb level of added functionality for your existing lenses – they turn a normal lens into a macro lens!

By attaching a reversing ring to the filter thread of a standard or moderate wide lens, it can then be mounted on a camera body in the same way as any other compatible optic. The attached lens, which may not have a macro function in its standard orientation, can now be used at very close focusing distances, allowing for high magnification.

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Home Photography Ideas: Flash and Splatter with Water Balloon Portraits https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-flash-and-splatter-with-water-balloon-portraits/ Wed, 06 May 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-flash-and-splatter-with-water-balloon-portraits/ Watch Video: Home Photography Ideas – Water Balloon Portraits A water balloon can be a wonderful prop for action portraits. Inspired by the portraits of photographer Tim Tadder, the exploding balloons almost look like wigs or water caps when frozen mid-explosion. Aside from all the aquatic fun, this project is also an exercise in lighting. […]]]>

Watch Video: Home Photography Ideas – Water Balloon Portraits

A water balloon can be a wonderful prop for action portraits. Inspired by the portraits of photographer Tim Tadder, the exploding balloons almost look like wigs or water caps when frozen mid-explosion.

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Home Photography Ideas: Take Clever Photos with Water Drops! https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-take-clever-photos-with-water-drops/ Mon, 04 May 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-take-clever-photos-with-water-drops/ Watch the video: Home Photography Ideas: Take Clever Photos with Water Drops! Want to try some clever shots to brighten up your confinement? So here’s a great one for you! Light travels much slower in water than in air, causing light rays to bend as they travel from medium to medium. It’s called refraction – […]]]>

Watch the video: Home Photography Ideas: Take Clever Photos with Water Drops!

Want to try some clever shots to brighten up your confinement? So here’s a great one for you! Light travels much slower in water than in air, causing light rays to bend as they travel from medium to medium. It’s called refraction – and it opens up a lot of creative photographic opportunities.

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Home Photography Ideas: Mini Motorized Adventures in Your Backyard https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-mini-motorized-adventures-in-your-backyard/ Fri, 01 May 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-mini-motorized-adventures-in-your-backyard/ Watch Video: Home Photography Ideas – Miniature Motorized Adventures Photographing miniature models and toys has captured the imagination of hundreds of thousands of photographers around the world. There’s something lovely about capturing a toy model in a real-life situation with your camera. And of course, in the current situation, shooting a scene with a model […]]]>

Watch Video: Home Photography Ideas – Miniature Motorized Adventures

Photographing miniature models and toys has captured the imagination of hundreds of thousands of photographers around the world. There’s something lovely about capturing a toy model in a real-life situation with your camera.

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Home photography ideas: how to make a triptych worthy of your wall https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-how-to-make-a-triptych-worthy-of-your-wall/ Thu, 30 Apr 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-how-to-make-a-triptych-worthy-of-your-wall/ Watch the video: Home photography ideas: how to make a triptych As the saying goes, “good things come in threes”, so we’re going to reveal some tips on shooting and selecting images to create a beautiful artistic triptych that deserves a place on your wall. Having the ability to display more than one frame as […]]]>

Watch the video: Home photography ideas: how to make a triptych

As the saying goes, “good things come in threes”, so we’re going to reveal some tips on shooting and selecting images to create a beautiful artistic triptych that deserves a place on your wall.

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Home Photography Ideas: Killer Portraits in Your Living Room https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-killer-portraits-in-your-living-room/ https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-killer-portraits-in-your-living-room/#respond Tue, 28 Apr 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/home-photography-ideas-killer-portraits-in-your-living-room/ In portrait photography, it is not always a question of overly complicated lighting installations and having several flashes fired at the same time; Sometimes keeping it simple is just as effective in capturing vivid images. In this tutorial, we are going to use a modest homemade light modifier combined with a single light source to […]]]>


In portrait photography, it is not always a question of overly complicated lighting installations and having several flashes fired at the same time; Sometimes keeping it simple is just as effective in capturing vivid images.

In this tutorial, we are going to use a modest homemade light modifier combined with a single light source to effectively draw attention to our subject. The result is a dramatic portrait that one would swear it was shot in the studio!

In terms of setup, all you’ll need is a nice open space to shoot and a single light source. We will use a Godox V860 flash, but this technique could very easily be adapted for use with studio strobes or even a bright desk lamp.

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This is because the key to achieving this lighting effect is not necessarily the light source itself, but rather how we modify it in order to generate a perfect letterbox of light to spot a specific part of the face of the person. model.

Shooting steps

01 Staging

Find a nice open space to work, ideally with a large white or neutral wall to take photos against, without shelves or photo frames. Alternatively, you can use a white studio background or even a plain sheet attached to the wall to give you the same effect.

02 Camera setup

When capturing portraits, it’s important that you use the right type of lens for the job. A lens with a focal length of 50mm or more is ideal so that your model’s facial features are not distorted. Wide angle lenses will distort the face and create an unrealistic appearance, so don’t shoot below 50mm unless you intentionally want to achieve this effect. We use the Sigma 50mm f / 1.4 DG HSM Art lens.

03 Lighting levels

Whether you’re using a studio strobe, flash, or desk lamp, your light source should be bright enough to overpower the ambient light in the room. If your light is not bright enough, you may need to turn off all the lights in the room and turn off the exterior windows.

04 Modify the light

In order to get a thin sliver of light, we will need to use a light modifier to reduce the scattering of the light. If you have a snoot tie it now – if you don’t have one you can make a simple modifier using cardboard!

05 Be smart

All you need is an appropriately sized cardboard box, a thick black card, a craft knife, and masking tape. Start by drilling a hole in one end of the box so that your flash head can fit comfortably. Then carefully cut a small slit in the black card – this will create the letterbox style lighting effect. Finally, cut a hole at the opposite end of the box and place the black card on it, securing it in place with duct tape. Place your light modifier on the end of your flash and voila!

06 Position your lighting

With your light modifier attached and your subject in place, move your light around until she projects the way you want on her face. If the flash has a modeling light, use it to guide you. If not, take a few test photos and refine the position accordingly.

07 Take the picture

Before you start taking photos, make sure you’re shooting in raw format, as this will give you more flexibility for later retouching. Feel free to change the angle and height of the light for different effects, and experiment more by highlighting different features of the face.

Changing the shot

01 Convert to mono

Start by opening your Raw image in Photoshop – this will bring up the Adobe Camera Raw interface. Set the Saturation slider to -100 to remove all colors and turn the image into black and white.

02 Flatten tones

Increase the Blacks slider to +100, Shadows to +100, then decrease the Highlights slightly to around -25. This will expand the dynamic range of the image before starting to increase the contrast.

03 Increase the contrast

Set the Clarity to +100 and the Contrast to +60 to add bags of depth to your mono conversion. If the whites in your photo appear a bit dull, increase the Exposure slider until they become lighter.

04 Sharpen to finish

Finally, go to the Details tab (below the histogram), then set the Quantity to 50, Radius to 3, and Detail to 50. Make sure to save the image as a JPEG, and voila. !

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