photo book – Potere Fotografico http://poterefotografico.com/ Sat, 26 Mar 2022 16:26:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://poterefotografico.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-28.png photo book – Potere Fotografico http://poterefotografico.com/ 32 32 Pandemic Park Life and the Secret Cult of Knitting: The Best Photography Books of 2021 Photography https://poterefotografico.com/pandemic-park-life-and-the-secret-cult-of-knitting-the-best-photography-books-of-2021-photography/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 15:45:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/pandemic-park-life-and-the-secret-cult-of-knitting-the-best-photography-books-of-2021-photography/ The book of photographs that I have returned to more than any other this year was Encampment Wyoming by Lora Webb Nichols, an extraordinary testimony to life in an American border community in the early 20th century. Comprised of photographs by Nichols and other local amateur photographers, it exudes a strong sense of place. Domestic […]]]>


The book of photographs that I have returned to more than any other this year was Encampment Wyoming by Lora Webb Nichols, an extraordinary testimony to life in an American border community in the early 20th century. Comprised of photographs by Nichols and other local amateur photographers, it exudes a strong sense of place. Domestic interiors and still lifes punctuate the portraits, which range from the spectral – a hazy, ghostly adult braiding a young girl’s hair – to the elegant – an elegant, dressed woman looking out a window. An intimate and captivating portrait of an era, a place and a nascent community.

Lizzie Nichols at Willow Glen 1899 Encampment, Wyoming Photography: Lora Webb Nichols / Fw: Books

Perhaps because of the oddly suspended nature of our time, I was also drawn to contemporary books which dealt with quiet reflection. Donavon Smallwood’s languor was created during the Spring and Summer 2020 lockdown, as he strolled through the woods in the relatively secluded northwest corner of Central Park in New York City. Smallwood’s images of glades, streams and ravines suggest stillness amid the city clamor and are punctuated by his skillfully composed portraits of the individuals who were regularly drawn there during the pandemic. The book’s subtext deals with the busy history of Central Park, a space that has often echoed the city’s racial tensions. “How does it feel to be a black person in the wild? Smallwood asks in this quietly powerful debut album.

Russian-born photographer Irina Rozovsky’s In Plain Air took her keen outsider gaze to yet another bucolic New York landscape, Brooklyn’s Prospect Park, which in summer is a microcosm of the city’s multicultural dynamics. . Again, the pandemic is the looming backdrop for these studies of people in artificial nature: walking, resting, working, playing, and interacting with each other and with their surroundings. A masterfully sustained study of mood, atmosphere and landscape.

Highly atmospheric ... a photo of Speak the Wind by Hoda Afshar.
Highly atmospheric … a photo of Speak the Wind by Hoda Afshar. Photography: Hoda Afshar

A much more otherworldly landscape serves as the backdrop for another impressive debut film, Speak the Wind, by Iranian-born photographer Hoda Afshar. She was drawn to the islands of Qeshm, Hormuz and Hengam in the Strait of Hormuz in the Persian Gulf by an age-old local belief that the wind that shaped the dramatic terrain is also the source of disease and possession by the spirits. His portraits and landscapes with lively atmospheres evoke the otherness of the islands, but also suggest the invisible and intangible, historical and community forces, which have shaped this intermediate place and helped shape its customs and beliefs. An ambitious and multi-level narrative that pays great attention in its approach to myth, ritual, landscape and the long shadow of colonial history.

“The essential solitude” by Tereza Zelenkova Photography: Tereza Zelenkova / Void Books

Originally self-published in a now sought after limited edition, The Essential Solitude by Tereza Zelenkova is an altogether different imaginative response to a mysterious place. In this case, the setting is the dark interior of a Grade II listed house in London’s East End, which belonged to the late Dennis Severs, an eccentric who designed it on his imaginary idea of ​​what might look like. an 18th century Huguenot dwelling. Influenced by the often esoteric literature, from the Decadents to transgressive thinkers such as Maurice Blanchot and Georges Bataille, Zelenkova’s work is rich in symbolism and suggestion, her singular gaze capturing the confusing atmosphere and increasingly blurred. ‘a house haunted by the extravagant imagination of its creator. .

A sense of foreboding also accompanies American photographer Carolyn Drake’s mysterious Knit Club, another ambitious and atmospheric meditation on place and community. Conceived as a collaboration between the photographer and an anonymous group of women, part fraternity, part secret cult, the book is a mischievous play on the Southern Gothic tradition that also contains a subversive feminist subtext. Drake’s shifting tale is borrowed from William Faulkner’s novel As I Lay Dying, while his skillfully constructed imagery nods to underground rituals and contested history in the Southern United States.

Allensworth, California.  2014. Fence post.
Allensworth, California. 2014. Fence post. Photograph: Matt Black / Magnum Photos

An often invisible United States emerges powerfully from the pages of Matt Black’s epic six-year American Geography, which spanned six years, the photographer crossing the country in a van and Greyhound bus to visit communities with over 20% poverty rates. . He was interested, he told me in 2016, in “the psychology of poverty”, and he succeeded in evoking this complex dynamic in austere and bewitching monochrome images. The visual narrative, however, is threaded with its own observations, snatches of overheard conversation, and everyday ephemera encountered at bus stations, truck stops, and roadside cafes. A masterpiece of contemporary documentary.

Photo books: Gilles Peress Whatever you say, don't say anything
Gilles Peress Whatever you say, don’t say anything Photograph: Steidl GmbH Co. OHG

Perhaps the Photobook of the Year event was the long-awaited publication of Whatever You Say Say Nothing by Gilles Peress, a two-volume epic of his photographs of the troubles in Northern Ireland. Structured in 22 semi-fictional days, the book is probably the most visceral and certainly the most ambitious evocation of what it was like to live in the tumult of these violent times. What impresses above all else is Peress’s uncanny ability to capture unique dramatic moments – of violence, mourning, resistance, brutality – that repeat themselves throughout as little variations on a more theme. wide of tribal and political division. The narrative is overwhelming, as it should be, and an accompanying volume, Annals of the North, provides much-needed context. An immensely important book, but prohibitively priced, aimed directly at the market of photo book collectors.

Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck, London, 1966, by James Barnor's Accra / London: a Retrospective.
Effortless … Drum Cover Girl Erlin Ibreck, London, 1966, by James Barnor’s Accra / London: a Retrospective. Photograph: Courtesy autograph

Two exhibition catalogs particularly marked me this year: Accra / London: a Retrospective by James Barnor, which accompanied the exhibition of the Ghanaian-born photographer at the Serpentine Gallery, and Coming Up for Air, which was published in parallel with the Survey exhibition by Stephen Gill at the Arnolfini Gallery in Bristol. The first showed how Barnor, who is 91, effortlessly transitioned from one genre to another – portrait, photojournalism, fashion – while creating a vibrant recording of the lives of ordinary Africans in his native Ghana and of the diaspora in the UK. The second was a journey into the inventive and restless mind of one of Britain’s most original contemporary photographers who traces Gill’s mischievously subversive gaze from downtown Hackney to rural Sweden. Both are highly recommended.

An image from Weathering Time by Nancy Floyd.
An epic self-portrait … an image from Weathering Time by Nancy Floyd. Photography: Nancy Floyd

In a strong year for women photographers’ books, I was also drawn to Nancy Floyd’s self-portrait epic, Weathering Time, which she describes as “my visual journal, my personal archives, and the recording of. my changing body and my surroundings over the past. Over 30 years. Since 1982 Floyd has tried to photograph himself every day, mostly standing, impassive, sometimes doing things with a dog or a family member. The book is edited from over 2,500 images, all of which are fairly ordinary, but acquire a deep resonance when sequenced chronologically.

Olga, 2017 Mirjana Vrbaski by Mirjana Vrbaški: Odd Time
Olga, 2017 Mirjana Vrbaski by Mirjana Vrbaški: Odd Time Photography: 2020 Courtesy of Mirjana Vrbaški

Finally, perhaps the most calmly resonant photo book I have received this year was Mirjana Vrbaski’s Odd Time, in which a selection of starkly beautiful portraits that wink at the old Dutch masters give way. place to almost ghostly images of the deep forest landscapes of Dalmatia. rating. There is a strange purity in the two sequences, but it is the portraits of the young women who haunt the imagination with their composure and their unreadable expressions. The silence that emanates from Vrbaski’s portraits speaks of a deep engagement with his subjects and invests his images with an almost disturbing presence, difficult to pin down, but extraordinarily palpable. A perfectly formed little book in which the pictures speak for themselves.


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Master of Arts Photography Course https://poterefotografico.com/master-of-arts-photography-course/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 22:31:42 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/master-of-arts-photography-course/ Whether you are looking to expand your photography practice around the world or take on a personal creative project, a PSC Master of Arts Photography can help. + Study at Australia’s preeminent specialist Photographic College founded in 1972+ Online and / or on campus at our brand new art facilities and studios in South Melbourne+ […]]]>


Whether you are looking to expand your photography practice around the world or take on a personal creative project, a PSC Master of Arts Photography can help.

+ Study at Australia’s preeminent specialist Photographic College founded in 1972
+ Online and / or on campus at our brand new art facilities and studios in South Melbourne
+ Join an international network of photographers, editors, curators, festival directors and writers.
+ Be supported and challenged to take your practice to the world stage.
+ Be supervised by award-winning photographers

The Master of Arts Photography program is designed to launch your career nationally and internationally. Unique in its delivery, the course benefits from a highly personalized and flexible approach.
The combination of intense periods (seminars, workshops, conferences and laboratories) and regular weekly sessions during the 18-month program (3 semesters) allows you to achieve your professional and creative goals and expand your practice in a supportive environment. and leading.
As a Master of Arts Photography student at Australia’s premier photography college, you will join an international network of photographers, editors, curators, festival directors and writers who will bring your practice to life. the world stage.
You will explore photographic culture, theory and practice in a contemporary and stimulating environment, and be taught and mentored by leaders in their fields.
PSC masters students explore a wide variety of projects and career paths, including photo book production, exhibitions, multimedia, journalism, curation, project management, publishing, and academia. .
If you want to establish a photography practice guided by internationally renowned photographers, PSC’s Master of Arts Photography might be the program for you.


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New photography books document the lives of 2 mysterious owls https://poterefotografico.com/new-photography-books-document-the-lives-of-2-mysterious-owls/ https://poterefotografico.com/new-photography-books-document-the-lives-of-2-mysterious-owls/#respond Sat, 31 Oct 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/new-photography-books-document-the-lives-of-2-mysterious-owls/ “Snowy Owl: A Visual Natural History”, by Paul Bannick Mountaineers Books, 2020. 128 pages. $ 18.95 Great Gray Owl: A Visual Natural History ”, by Paul Bannick Mountaineers Books, 2020. 128 pages. $ 18.95 Who doesn’t love owls? We hear them softly hoo-hoo at night or spot silent flights at dawn. It’s always a pleasure […]]]>


“Snowy Owl: A Visual Natural History”, by Paul Bannick

Mountaineers Books, 2020. 128 pages. $ 18.95

Great Gray Owl: A Visual Natural History ”, by Paul Bannick

Mountaineers Books, 2020. 128 pages. $ 18.95

Who doesn’t love owls? We hear them softly hoo-hoo at night or spot silent flights at dawn. It’s always a pleasure to meet one of the 10 species that inhabit Alaska.

Seattle photographer Paul Bannick has long been fascinated by owls and has traveled widely to study and photograph them. To accompany his previous books on owls – “The Owl and the Woodpecker: Encounters with North America’s Most Iconic Birds” and “Owl: A Year in the Lives of North American Owls” – he has now published specific volumes for two of the most large and most intriguing species native to our state. While both books are most impressive for their outstanding photographs, they incorporate natural history information, first-person accounts of the author’s owl experiences, and sections on bird conservation statuses and what we can do to help.

Of the two species, snowy owls are perhaps the more mysterious and have offered significant photography challenges. As Bannick explains in his preface, he has spent “tens of thousands of hours in the field to better understand these owls.” He made more than a dozen trips to the Arctic and photographed during the 12 months, facing freezing temperatures, wind, fog, technical difficulties and storms that stranded him at airports. His photographs include birds of all ages and in multiple behaviors, from chicks in tundra nests to mature adults hunting, courting, perching on graveyard crosses and wooden sleds, and in flight. Portraits distinguish males from females (larger and darker), capture feather and foot detail, and showcase the hypnotic yellow eyes of the birds. The last photo in the book, of a pure white owl staring against a pure white background, is stunning.

The photos also include the larger environments in which the snowy owls live. We learn of their preference for nesting on tundra mounds, which are cleared of snow earlier than the surrounding land and serve as advantages for monitoring predators, and their reliance on lemmings. We see them in altercations with jaegers, hawks, crows and arctic foxes and in close proximity to other species that share their northern landscapes.

In some years, large numbers of snowy owls migrate south from their home ranges in what are called eruptions. Bannick approaches this phenomenon with particular attention to two recent outbreaks, in 2011-12 and 2013-14; in the first, owls have appeared in 35 states and all 10 Canadian provinces, and in the second in large numbers from New England to the Great Lakes. As he explains, these eruptions were thought to be related to the cyclical decline of lemmings and the threat of famine. Researchers now believe the outbreaks are more related to prey abundance and breeding success, resulting in an excess of young-of-the-year moving south for the winter.

The second book, “Great Gray Owl,” follows a similar format, with equally fabulous photographs accompanied by natural history facts and Bannick’s own narration. Great Grays live in a very different environment from snowy owls – dense forests with access to open edges like meadows for hunting voles and other small mammals. They nest on the tops of broken trees and in the nests of crows and raptors. The young leave the nest before they can fly, and they depend on leaning trees and snags to climb their way, using beaks and claws, from the ground to heights where they can roost safely.

Among the fascinating facts about this species is its winter hunting technique. The great gray’s exceptional hearing – aided by a facial disc that focuses and amplifies sound at asymmetrical ear openings – helps it hear its prey under up to 18 inches of snow. Several photos document face-first dives in the snow, in which clenched feet are pushed forward at the last second. This technique, Bannick says, allows owls “to break through snow and ice that could support the weight of a 180-pound person.” The same ability allows them to pierce the grass to reach the prey below.

Bannick insists in both books on his adherence to the ethical practices of photography. That is, he uses long lenses for close-ups and does not interfere with the normal and natural behavior of his subjects. It doesn’t use decoy or bait, edit unwanted elements in an image, or create composites. It is, as he puts it, “nature as it is rather than as we wanted it to appear.”

The last sections of the books deal with the future of the species. In both cases, habitat loss, often linked to climate change, is the major concern. In the case of snowy owls, thawing permafrost and decreasing snow thickness threaten their main food source, lemmings, and the loss of sea ice reduces their ability to hunt sea ducks in winter. . The Great Gray Owl’s need for mature forests with dead trees and snags is threatened by timber harvesting, forest thinning and forest fires. Both species are considered indicator species; that is, their condition indicates the general health of all of their ecosystems.

To help these amazing animals continue to contribute to the world and our lives, Bannick urges us not only to take action individually – such as protecting private properties where owls may live and avoiding rodent poisons – but to be prepared. to defend politically and economically.


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11 of the best queer photography books https://poterefotografico.com/11-of-the-best-queer-photography-books/ https://poterefotografico.com/11-of-the-best-queer-photography-books/#respond Wed, 17 Jun 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/11-of-the-best-queer-photography-books/ This content contains affiliate links. When you buy through these links, we may earn an affiliate commission. In late June 1969, members of the queer community fought back against raids on gay and lesbian bars in Greenwich Village, New York. Fifty-one years later, June is the pride; a unique tribute to the queer community present […]]]>


This content contains affiliate links. When you buy through these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

In late June 1969, members of the queer community fought back against raids on gay and lesbian bars in Greenwich Village, New York. Fifty-one years later, June is the pride; a unique tribute to the queer community present and past. To honor Pride Day, I’ve collected 11 queer photography books that celebrate the lives and loves of LGBTQ + people.

We Are Everywhere: Protest, Power and Pride in Queer Liberation History by Matthew Riemer and Leighton Brown

Los Angeles Book Review called it “probably the best tabletop book ever.” The curators of Instagram account @lgbt_history created this photo book in 2019. It is a collection of images spanning thousands of years and creates a powerful argument for learning more about the queer past so we can honor the future appropriately.

Drag Queens by Kit Kittle

In 1983, Kit Kittle began photographing West Village drag queens. The book that Kittle was collecting photographs for was not published due to the AIDS epidemic, but in 2015 it was given new life through Kickstarter. We are all blessed to be able to see the 80s drag community: full of street theater, smiley faces and truly spectacular 80s fashion.

Butch by Kanithea Powell

It’s not often in popular culture that butch women are associated with fashion – the stereotype usually includes a combination of flannel shirts, cargo pants, Doc Martens, and a ‘fuck your fashion’ attitude. Powell Mannish crushes this stereotype and broadens the definition of the term. It is a true art book, trendy and provocative, asking us to reconsider our preconceptions about what is “masculine” versus “feminine” and why we need such definitions.

Les Invisibles: Vintage Portraits of Love and Pride by Sébastien Lifshitz

Before homosexuality was decriminalized, most members of the queer community were forced to live in lockdowns. You would think this implies that photographs of queer people from eras bygone are hard to find, and to some extent, they can be. But they’re over there, and director Sébastien Lifshitz has scoured flea markets and garage sales to collect a book of photographs of gay couples dating from around 1900-1960. If the cover image of two dapper gentlemen in suits, sporty smiles and a parasol, doesn’t raise your blood sugar, then I don’t know what can.

Queer X Design by Andy Campbell

In the 13 months since Queer X Design was published, it has become a touchstone in the modern history of graphic design that accompanies queer movements. This is a collection of originals – the first “The Future is Female” shirt, Baker’s original rainbow flag, Act-Up’s “Silence = Death” poster – which simultaneously have shaped and been shaped by the queer movement over the past 50 years.

Alvin Baltrop piers

In the 1970s and 1980s, Manhattan’s West Side was covered in crumbling piers and rotten warehouses. No longer used for shipping or industry, it has become a gathering place for artists, homosexuals, prostitutes and other people relegated to the margins of society. Alvin Baltrop documented this community in explicit detail. His photographs offer the flip side of Andy Warhol and Studio 54’s glittery medal. You can get a taste of Baltrop’s aesthetic in the photographs of “Manhattan’s West Side Piers, Back When They Were Naked And Gay” of New York Magazine in 2015.

Dark Tears: LGBTQ Resilience in Latin America by Claudia Jares

Claudia Jares is an Argentinian performance artist and photographer. She brings both skills to bear in this black and white photographic exploration of the lives of different Latin American and South American couples across the LGBTQ + spectrum. Latin America is still largely conservative Catholic, and Jares delves into the secret history of the queer Latinx community, while celebrating the growing acceptance of non-heteronormative people.

PRIDE: Fifty years of parades and protests from New York Times photographic archive by Abrams Books

That’s exactly what it says in the headline: The NYT went through its archives and put together an illustrated history of everything from the Stonewall riots to the Christopher Street Parade in 1970 to the trans rights marches in 2019. The images are contextualized by articles, and provide a rich history of event coverage by the NYT. It’s important to note, however, that because the NYT is based in New York City, there isn’t much coverage of West Coast activism. There is also a lack of coverage of people of color in the LGBTQ + movement, particularly in previous work. This is no surprise given the BIPOC’s erasure from historical records in general, but it needs to be addressed at all levels of the media, including the NYT in the future.

Art after Stonewall, 1969-1989 edited by Jonathan Weinberg

Art after Stonewall reflects on the immediate impact of the LGBTQ + movement on the art world. It focuses on our artists like Warhol and Mapplethorpe, as well as the work of artists whose work intersects with queer culture. Many of the artists who helped advance the movement are largely unknown 50 years later; this work aims to remedy this loss.

Bordered Lives: Transgender Portraits of Mexico By Kike Arnal

Kike Arnal is an internationally renowned photographer and documentary maker. In Lives bordered, it sheds a sincere and human light on seven transgender people in and around Mexico City, documenting their movements in their daily lives. The aim of this work is to humanize transgender individuals and challenge preconceptions about beauty in Latin American culture, especially Mexican, and by all readers’ accounts, Arnal is achieving his goal.

LGBT: San Francisco: The Photographs of Daniel Nicoletta

As a Bay Area resident, I would be remiss if I did not include a book on San Francisco. It’s a metropolis that takes its role as a Mecca for LGBTQ + people seriously. This doesn’t mean that we don’t have our own issues (we do), but rather that there aren’t many other places where you can see a drag queen on a unicycle and just think of you. – even, “it’s a new wig since last week!” Daniel Nicoletta is a photographer and icon in his own right in the Bay Area. It’s chronicled the San Francisco trip since the 1970s, and if you’ve seen any of Harvey Milk’s iconic photos or the USPS stamp, you’ve seen Nicoletta’s work.



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Eight beautiful photography books to buy in June https://poterefotografico.com/eight-beautiful-photography-books-to-buy-in-june/ https://poterefotografico.com/eight-beautiful-photography-books-to-buy-in-june/#respond Wed, 12 Jun 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/eight-beautiful-photography-books-to-buy-in-june/ From a study of English roses to Welsh kids wearing fashion in the valleys, here are some of the best photography books to get your hands on. this month June 12, 2019 This month’s pick of incredible photography books covers flora, fashion and a ‘future fantasy’ – these are the publications we are excited to […]]]>


From a study of English roses to Welsh kids wearing fashion in the valleys, here are some of the best photography books to get your hands on. this month


This month’s pick of incredible photography books covers flora, fashion and a ‘future fantasy’ – these are the publications we are excited to buy now.

Ffasiwn Magazine by Clémentine Schneidermann and Charlotte James, published by the Martin Parr Foundation and Bleak & Fabulous

It’s called Ffasiwn, a series by Clémentine Schneidermann and Charlotte James that merges fashion, documentary and portrait photography in its documentation of children in the South Wales valleys, is now published as a zine titled Ffasiwn Magazine, which was designed by Claire Huss. Schneidermann and James collaborated with the Welsh children in workshops on fashion and styling. “I hope the children were encouraged to turn to the creative arts and generally enjoyed being a part of the project. Without them the project wouldn’t exist, ”James told us, and the striking photographs were recently exhibited at the Martin Parr Foundation in Bristol.

Art school by Matthew Finn, published by Stanley / Barker

The captivating series of Matthew Finn, Art school, compiles beautiful portraits of children from art schools in London from the 1990s. 1997, the year Finn – himself barely 24 years old – took pictures of students aged 17 and 18 years at an art school in Watford, has been an exciting time for British art, and his black and white photographs capture confidence and optimism. this might seem foreign to students in 2019. “We had this new government, but more importantly, we had the Charles Saatchi effect. He stood up for the YBAs, Tracey Emin, Sarah Lucas and Damian Hirst, people not much older than us who we knew lived and worked nearby, ”says Finn. “All of a sudden we had artists of our own generation to admire – it was almost like they belonged to us.”

English rose by Luke Stephenson, published by Stephenson Press

An English summer also sees the arrival of English roses. With 65 varieties of roses each photographed against a blue background brighter than the sky, photographer Luke Stephenson’s new post is a study of the nation’s favorite flower. Stephenson worked with David Austin Roses on the project, and English rose captures the rich and vivid variety of colors and shapes throughout the flower. Look for their fascinating names as well: from The Lady of Shallott and Roald Dahl to The Albrighton Rambler and Gertrude Jekyll. Plus, find prints from the beautiful series available for purchase through the Photographers Gallery now.

New York Polaroids 1975-1983 by Tom Bianchi, published by Damiani

Tom Bianchi’s Polaroids, taken in the late 1970s and early 1980s in New York City, provide an intimate glimpse into the city’s burgeoning LGBT scene at the time. Bianchi moved to New York City in 1975 and documented his life, friends and lovers with a Polaroid camera, the results of which are now published in a book called 63 E 9th Street. New York Polaroids 1975-1983. “We were kids from the heart of the United States, which was an incredibly dysfunctional place. New York, [and places] like Fire Island, were our world. Not only did we meet people who were physically attractive, but we also discovered gyms and took care of ourselves physically, ”Bianchi told Another Man earlier this month. “I think a lot of gay people like me saw us as the kid who was last picked for the sports team in the gym and not as good as the other boys. Suddenly we turned that around and became our own fantasies for each other. “

Fantasy of the future by Vinca Petersen, published by Idem

A second edition of Vinca Petersen’s 1990’s Diaries is published this month. “With Fantasy of the future, I wanted to take away the feeling of [rave] being extraordinary, to make it feel a bit ordinary so that everyone can relate to it, that they can even be their pictures of their era, or photos they take now, ”Petersen recently told Another Man. Fantasy of the future, which was originally released in 2017 and is the result of a collaboration with Ben Ditto, features flyers, letters and photographs (by Corinne Day) that encapsulate Peterson’s life of delirium, modeling and living between houses and squats in London.

Maldicidade by Miguel Rio Branco, edited by Taschen

Miguel Rio Branco’s nomadic education as son of diplomats fuels Maldicidade, a study of cities around the world and their living, grainy realities. In vivid color, Rio Branco’s photographs delve into the undocumented side of city life, which the imager has grown accustomed to documenting for over 40 years. the exit of Taschen from Maldicidade coincides with an exhibition of the photographs at the Galeria Luisa Strina in São Paulo.

Made in Dublin by Eamonn Doyle, published by Thames & Hudson

“When you live in a downtown area, you have these brief encounters hundreds of times a week, but they can be loaded with pretty powerful feelings of lust, disgust, or just utter indifference. So the street can be a very stimulating place, ”Eamonn Doyle told AnOther on the occasion of his installation, Made in Dublin, at Photo London last month. A photo book of the same name has just been released, and brings together the archival work of the Irish photographer and some unpublished and unpublished images. Made in Dublin is a collaboration between Doyle and his longtime friends: a series of texts by Kevin Barry presents and the book was designed by Niall Sweeney.

South: Big Sur by Kirk Crippens, published by Schilt

When a landslide in 2017 cut off road access to Big Sur, California’s rugged coastline, photographer Kirk Crippens traveled to the scenic area to capture its lands and people. Now published in a publication by Schilt, Crippens’ photographs showcase the region’s awe-inspiring landscapes as well as quieter moments shot inside the homes of Big Sur residents. The mountainous coastline at the time was isolated and unusually calm – its four million annual tourists could not make it to the area – and Crippens spent two years filming this period of transition, as work was underway to rebuild highway 1.


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Sold: the most expensive photography books https://poterefotografico.com/sold-the-most-expensive-photography-books/ https://poterefotografico.com/sold-the-most-expensive-photography-books/#respond Sun, 21 Apr 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/sold-the-most-expensive-photography-books/ Do you know which was the most expensive photography book ever sold? What would your guess be? How about the more expensive photography books on store shelves? The rarest or the most sought after? Make some guesses, write them down, then compare when you get to the end. (Note: all values ​​in USD, converted at […]]]>


Do you know which was the most expensive photography book ever sold? What would your guess be? How about the more expensive photography books on store shelves? The rarest or the most sought after? Make some guesses, write them down, then compare when you get to the end.

(Note: all values ​​in USD, converted at time of writing)

Print value

Sumo, a monograph by Taschen on the work of Helmut Newton (1999), sold at auction for $ 430,000. Of course, this version was signed by 80 of Newton’s famous subjects. The original 10,000 print is sold out, but if you bought one at the time, your initial investment of $ 1,500 would now net you a tidy sum in the range of $ 8,000 to $ 20,000. I’m lucky to have a reprint on my shelf that cost just under $ 150 at the time of purchase (thanks, John!).

Currently, the most expensive original prints available on so-called retail shelves are Taschen’s Leibovitz monograph and GOAT, a photo book by Muhammad Ali. GOAT sells for $ 15,000 if you want real prints with or $ 6,000 if you want a first edition. It’s a good deal at $ 150 if you want an unlimited printed copy. Leibovitz’s monograph sells for $ 5,000 with a signature and an archival contact sheet. Or, for the low price of $ 3,000, if you skip the contact sheet and go for a signed original. There is no serial printing of Leibovitz’s monograph yet.

These Taschen books are beautiful, but the prices are steeped in the multiple signatures, limited editions, and the inclusion of real photo prints. The books themselves aren’t worth the thousands, as evidenced by the reduced prices once Taschen removes the bells and whistles.

Auction value

The AbeBooks online auction and bookseller publishes a list of their best sellers each year. In 2018, a signed copy of Photographs of Mexico (1940) by Paul Strand sold for $ 16,000. In 2014, two copies of David Baily’s Box of Pin Ups (1965) sold on Abe, one for just under $ 12,000. Neither has been signed. Interestingly, the Strand and Baily collections are loose leaf. Just in case you’re in the market, there is currently a signed copy of Baily’s book on Amazon for $ 25,000. Do you have change to burn?

I had trouble finding auction prices for the hardcover books. While auction listings are easy to find, what they sell for is often kept a secret by auction houses. The highest auction price is probably that of The North American Indian (1907) by Edward Curtis. From what I could find, early editions regularly sell for over $ 1 million at auction. Again, this is a loose leaf, more of a portfolio than a book. The information I could find implied that the earliest hardcover versions of Curtis’ book sold for between $ 10,000 and $ 50,000, depending on the state. If you’re interested, Christopher Cardozo, art collector and historian in Saint-Paul, republishes Curtis’s work in two special editions, one for $ 37,500 and a budget version for $ 6,500. Magnificent anyway!

AbeBooks has an interesting article floating around in their archives that summarizes the most collectable books. I’m not sure what Abe means by collectable, but the list is essentially a who’s who of early 20th century photographers: Robert Frank’s The Americans (1958-1959), Brassaï’s Paris de Nuit (1933), The Decisive Moment by Cartier-Bresson. (1952), Sierra Nevada by Ansel Adams (1938) and Let Us Now Praise Famous Men (1941) by James Agee and Walker Evan. While you can buy reprints of these books, the original print versions will set you back a pretty penny.

Rare and out of print books

Further research of the internet reveals dozens of lists of rare photography books. Med Sod Forstaelse by Krass Clement (1982), a monograph on Danish prostitution, Moments Preserved by Irving Penn (1960), Calvin Klein Jeans by Bruce Weber (1991), Twenty-Six Gasoline Stations by Ed Ruscha (1967), Tulsa by Larry Clarke (1971), The Teenage Smokers by Ed Templeton (1999), and The Bangy Book / New York Street Boys (1988) by Vincent Alan W seem to reappear over and over again. Aside from Tulsa, these books are all out of print. You should be able to find copies of Penn’s book, but finding a good copy of the others will be a chore and cost you up to a thousand dollars.

The Family of Man, a gallery catalog for the eponymous exhibition, curated by Edward Steichen, has been in print since 1955. From what I could find, it is the longest print run of any photography book.

Speaking of exhaustion, Book Finder publishes a list of the most wanted out of print books every year. Although it moves up and down the list, Madonna’s Sex appears on their lists year after year.

Currently, Amazon lists Kate T. Parker’s Strong is the New Pretty (2017), followed by two Obama photography books as the best-selling photography books by volume. It must be the Trump effect. Funny, Ansel Adams’ ubiquitous wall calendar makes it into the top ten despite not technically being a book. Rounding out the top ten you’ll find At Work by Annie Leibovitz and Dogs Underwater by Seth Casteel. I’m sure Anne Geddes would figure somewhere in a record sales volume figure.

I find it very interesting that Adams and Ruscha are landscape photographers: Weber, Penn, Leibovitz, Baily and Newton are fashion photographers, but the rest of these lists are dominated by street photographers or ethno-photographers. Does this surprise you? It certainly surprised me.

Well if you played the game and guessed the bestsellers before reading, were you right?

Main image provided by Christopher Cardozo


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Seven Brilliant New Photography Books To Buy Now https://poterefotografico.com/seven-brilliant-new-photography-books-to-buy-now/ https://poterefotografico.com/seven-brilliant-new-photography-books-to-buy-now/#respond Wed, 10 Apr 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/seven-brilliant-new-photography-books-to-buy-now/ From an investigation of Coco Capitán’s work to a captivating portrayal of New York youth by Marie Tomanova, a guide to the most exciting publications available this april April 10, 2019 Busy life by Coco Capitán, published by Loose Joints As a personal exhibition of Coco Capitán, Busy living with everyone, everywhere, all the time, […]]]>


From an investigation of Coco Capitán’s work to a captivating portrayal of New York youth by Marie Tomanova, a guide to the most exciting publications available this april


Busy life by Coco Capitán, published by Loose Joints

As a personal exhibition of Coco Capitán, Busy living with everyone, everywhere, all the time, continues in Paris, Loose Joints publishes a monograph to accompany the show. The fashion and commercial photography of Capitán (the Spanish imager worked with brands like Gucci) is featured in Busy life, as well as images from his personal archives. “I’m 27 at the moment and moved to London when I was a teenager. I’ve always done my writing and my photography, but I don’t have any older works than this in this exhibition, ”Capitán said in a recent interview with AnOther. “I didn’t want the exhibition to be a retrospective of my working time so far – that would be a bit arrogant considering my age. I think it’s more interesting to think about the present moment.

Inside the ass by Frank and Tyrone Lebon, published by DoBeDo Projects

Brothers and brilliant photographers in their own right, Frank and Tyrone Lebon have teamed up on a limited edition photo book documenting the making of Harmony Korine’s new film. beach ass. Shot over six weeks in 2017, Inside the ass includes photographs and stills from films starring Matthew McConaughey, Jonah Hill, Isla Fisher, Snoop Dogg and Zac Efron, as well as “written diary entries, call sheets and vintage Florida tourist props” . A beautiful and highly original publication, this book offers unprecedented insight into the creative process of one of modern cinema’s most distinctive voices.

Analogies by Stuart Franklin, published by Hatje Cantz

Analogies is a new publication by British photographer Stuart Franklin, whose work focuses primarily on nature and geography. The lyrical landscapes compiled in this latest book all seek to reveal human influences and elements, as Franklin explores the metaphorical potentials of the natural world. The beautiful black and white images have been captured all over the world and offer an alternate look at the relationship between humans and our environment.

Rest by Charlotte Gainsbourg, from Classic Books / Because editions

Bearing the same name as his fifth album, Rest by Charlotte Gainsbourg is a book that seeks to extend the story behind the record. The book is a deeply personal account of the album’s birth, from influences to lyrics, illustrated with photographs – self-portraits, shots of New York, where she lives, and of her three children – and drawings by Gainsbourg. (Watch out for Gainsbourg performing the acclaimed Coachella album this year as well.)

Young american by Marie Tomanova, published by Paradigm

Czech photographer Marie Tomanova’s captivating portraits of New York City’s youth caught the eye of Ryan McGinley, who wrote an introduction for Tomanova’s first book on her famous series. Young american. Tomanova has captured her peers in their homes or in the underground clubs of her adopted city, and the resulting portraits form an intimate and inclusive view of contemporary New York youth culture.

Do not feed the alligators by David Shama, published by Damiani

that of David Shama Do not feed the alligators is a photographic exploration of the southern states of America, seen through the eyes of a foreign relative (Shama is originally from Switzerland and based in New York). The photographer captures the simultaneous excitement and banality of everyday life through snapshots of his peers and featuring quintessentially American tropes: motels, diners, swamps, amusement parks and empty winding roads appear in his warm images. Released at the end of 2018, the tome published by Damiani was recently brought back to New York for the AIPAD Photography Show.

Laurent Benaïm, published by Taschen

“I attended photography school in 1982 and immediately and instinctively became interested in portraying sexuality,” French photographer Laurent Benaïm recently told AnOther. “Over time, I became aware of the fundamental importance of everything that mixes eroticism, sex and feelings of love by launching myself into a real enterprise to bear witness to the diversity of sexualities. Benaïm’s singular practice has been exploring sexuality and individuals’ interest in sexual taboos for nearly three decades, and Taschen has now published a comprehensive review of his work.



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Brooklyn Beckham leaves prestigious photography class in New York https://poterefotografico.com/brooklyn-beckham-leaves-prestigious-photography-class-in-new-york/ https://poterefotografico.com/brooklyn-beckham-leaves-prestigious-photography-class-in-new-york/#respond Sun, 15 Jul 2018 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/brooklyn-beckham-leaves-prestigious-photography-class-in-new-york/ He received a lot of scathing reviews when he published his own photography book last year. And now Brooklyn Beckham has quit her photography class in New York after just a year because she misses her mother, Victoria, according to the Mirror. The 19-year-old withdrew from his four-year course, which he started last September at […]]]>


He received a lot of scathing reviews when he published his own photography book last year.

And now Brooklyn Beckham has quit her photography class in New York after just a year because she misses her mother, Victoria, according to the Mirror.

The 19-year-old withdrew from his four-year course, which he started last September at the world-renowned Parsons School of Design.

Homesickness: Brooklyn Beckham quit her photography class in New York after a year because she misses her mother, Victoria, according to the Mirror (pictured in June 2017)

Tuition at the prestigious school costs over $ 23,000 per term.

Son of football legend David and former Spice Girl Victoria was reportedly homesick and his family was missing in UK

He told friends months ago that he wanted to leave – according to the Mirror, but decided to hold on until the end of the term.

Brooklyn, the eldest of David and Victoria’s four children, has postponed the course for an internship with a respected British photographer, whose name remains secret.

Feeling keen: He came in for scathing reviews when he published a photography book last year (pictured July 6)

Feeling keen: He came in for scathing reviews when he published a photography book last year (pictured July 6)

Sources said his mother Spice Girl was thrilled to be reunited with her boy – telling her friends that she “absolutely hated” being separated from him.

An insider told the Mirror: “It looks like he was really homesick and felt lonely there.

“He loves his family, it was ultimately the bait to come back to them that made him rock – and the prospect of a great internship.

“Victoria is absolutely thrilled with the news and couldn’t contain herself as everything went according to plan – having Brooklyn under one roof again is a dream come true for her.”

Mom, I love you: Sources say his mom Spice Girl is overjoyed to be reunited with her boy (pictured June 2017)

Mom, I love you: Sources say his mom Spice Girl is overjoyed to be reunited with her boy (pictured June 2017)

The source said Victoria, 44, was “thrilled” with Brooklyn’s return, adding: “She was telling her friends that she couldn’t believe how much she missed him and hated being apart from him.” .

Brooklyn, who dated Chloe Grace Moretz until March this year, was spotted with new girlfriend Lexy Panterra, 29, at the Wireless Festival last weekend in London.

The teenager published a photo book, What I See, which was criticized by critics last year.

One of them said the book contained “gruesome photos and worse captions.”

Brooklyn is the oldest of their four children, they also have sons Romeo, 15, and Cruz, 13, and daughter Harper, seven.

Leader: Brooklyn is the oldest of four Beckham children, they also have sons Romeo, 15, and Cruz, 13, and daughter Harper, seven;  seen in june

Leader: Brooklyn is the oldest of four Beckham children, they also have sons Romeo, 15, and Cruz, 13, and daughter Harper, seven; seen in june


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8 new photography books released in February https://poterefotografico.com/8-new-photography-books-released-in-february/ https://poterefotografico.com/8-new-photography-books-released-in-february/#respond Thu, 22 Feb 2018 08:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/8-new-photography-books-released-in-february/ Ralph Gibson: The Black Trilogy, by Ralph Gibson. Photo: Mary Ellen Mark. Courtesy of the University of Texas Press. Are you looking to treat yourself to something particularly pleasing this month? A rich range of photographs taken during repeated visits to Walter De Maria’s Lightning field, a chronicle of the civil rights struggle in the […]]]>


Ralph Gibson: The Black Trilogy, by Ralph Gibson.
Photo: Mary Ellen Mark. Courtesy of the University of Texas Press.

Are you looking to treat yourself to something particularly pleasing this month? A rich range of photographs taken during repeated visits to Walter De Maria’s Lightning field, a chronicle of the civil rights struggle in the historic Resurrection City encampment, and a collection of works by a radical innovator of the photo book genre are some of the best recent and upcoming collections available this month.

Walter De Maria: The Lightning Field

Photo: Walter De Maria, The Lightning Field, 1977. Long-term facility, western New Mexico. © The estate of Walter De Maria. Photo: John Cliett. Courtesy of the Dia Art Foundation, New York

Since 1977, visitors to The lightning field, Walter De Maria’s installation of 400 stainless steel poles arranged in a vast grid in Catron County, New Mexico, arrived in the hopes of seeing the famous Land Art installation live up to its name, or at least to witness a desert landscape whose apparent emptiness is part of what makes its beauty. Walter De Maria: The Lightning Field, published by the Dia Foundation (which still maintains the installation), presents a sublime series of photographs taken from 1978 to 1979 by the late John Cliett. Cliett has taken photographs at dawn and dusk and moonrise and late afternoon, and he catches flashes of light both day and night; blooming desert flowers; eerie, impossible and rich red sunsets; and the lavender sky at dawn. The images are contextualized by De Maria’s prescriptive rules for the play and Cliett’s notes on the photographs. Some visitors will leave without ever seeing lightning; Cliett sometimes catches it with a double strike. He has pointed his camera at or near the same sight over and over again, and yet the vast and endless variations among these stunning landscapes prove that no two images are the same; lightning never strikes twice.

City of the Resurrection, 1968

Photo: Jill Freedman. Stamped by the photographer on the back. Courtesy of Steven Kasher Gallery, New York.

Following the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., then-amateur photographer Jill Freedman quit her editorial job and her life in New York City and joined thousands in the Poor People’s Campaign, the movement King had organized. For six weeks, in an occupation that would later have echoes on Occupy Wall Street and Standing Rock, people from across the country caraved to Washington, DC, pitching makeshift tents and shelters, and creating a thriving village on the National Mall. Living among them, resisting heavy rains and mud, Freedman photographed the daily life of what has become the city of the resurrection, as well as its nonviolent rallies, actions and marches. Seen 50 years later in City of the Resurrection: 1968 (which was also the subject of a recent exhibition at the Steven Kasher Gallery), his black and white prints are honest and moving portraits of ordinary people at the heart of this historic uprising.

Double vision: the photography of George Rodriguez

Photo: Photograph by George Rodriguez. Courtesy of Hat and Beard Press.

In a year where farm workers join Hollywood actresses on stage at awards ceremonies in a gesture of solidarity, here is a book that crosses both these worlds and some, Double vision: the photography of George Rodriguez (Hat & Beard Press). A photographer raised in South Los Angeles, Rodriguez has had rare access to multiple and diverse worlds, documenting Chicano civil rights struggles and United Farmworker strikes (Dolores Huerta contributes an introduction), as well as gang wars, boxing matches, protests and riots, red carpet premieres of movies that will become classics and hip-hop premieres. He counted Natalie Wood and Dennis Hopper as friends. (Doors drummer John Densmore contributes on another essay.) In a mix of black-and-white and color images, Rodriguez’s photographs offer a fascinating section of the divergent worlds of LA.

Experimental Lake

Photo: Photograph by Guillaume Simoneau. Courtesy of MACK.

Images of glassy blue waters, twilight-tinged clouds and trees are juxtaposed with portraits of field scientists wearing waders in Canadian photographer Guillaume Simoneau Experimental Lake (Mack). The book shares its name with an ecosystem of 59 once pristine lakes and watersheds in Ontario, where researchers are studying the effects of various stresses on the aquatic environment; Experimental Lake is not the subject but the point of view from which Simoneau produced these strangely edifying and evocative images.

Ralph Gibson: The Black Trilogy

Photo: Mary Ellen Mark. Courtesy of the University of Texas Press.

at Ralph Gibson The black trilogy collects three now classic titles – The sleepwalker (1970), Already seen (1973), and Days at sea (1974) – which transformed the photo book genre in radically sharp ways. In a beautifully mysterious, high-contrast black and white grain, Gibson’s narrative works unfold like dream sequences or, as some have described, like photo novels: voyeuristic and alluring.

365 days of invisible work

Photo: Spector Books

365 days of invisible work is a rare and remarkable window on the professional and daily life invisible or barely noticed by waitresses, maids, dishwashers, gardeners and undocumented migrants. These images, placed in their workplaces or in their daily life, requested by Werker magazine and the Netherlands-based Domestic Worker Photographer Network are taken by the workers themselves. These amateur photographers seize an opportunity to represent themselves – strangers giving an intimate, inner look at how they make a living.

Home

Photo: David Alan Harvey / Magnum Photos

The artists and documentary filmmakers of the longtime Magnum Photos cooperative are known to represent the lives of others, in conflict zones and on the front lines around the world, but rarely point the camera at themselves or at home. This is precisely the subject of an exhibition route in ten cities and its accompanying collection. Home, consisting of personal photographs depicting childbirths, adolescents and aging parents, crosses New Zealand, London, Buenos Aires and the Midwest. Sixteen members of the collective, including Elliott Erwitt, Moises Saman, Alessandra Sanguinetti and Alec Soth, team up with Fujifilm to visually explore notions of our complicated relationship with ideas about family, motherhood, fatherhood and where we come from.

Noah Scialom’s next posthumous book
Until his death earlier this year at the age of 28, Noah Scialom-Herman devoted his days to photographing the streets and people of Baltimore, immersing himself in the neighborhoods in images that showed a great affection for the life of his subjects and a spirit of wit and adventure. “He had this weird ability to be close to something crazy,” a colleague in the Baltimore said. Sun, where Scialom-Herman’s photographs frequently appeared. His Instagram feed, hailed by Time magazine as one of the best in the country, was often described as a “community”; his photographs of the Baltimore uprising have been published in local newspapers and the Guardian, The Atlantic, and The New York Times Magazine. When he died he was working on a new book and devastated fellow photographers, family and friends are fundraising to publish it.



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Brooklyn Beckham looks to drop prestigious photography class just months after starting https://poterefotografico.com/brooklyn-beckham-looks-to-drop-prestigious-photography-class-just-months-after-starting/ https://poterefotografico.com/brooklyn-beckham-looks-to-drop-prestigious-photography-class-just-months-after-starting/#respond Sun, 04 Feb 2018 08:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/brooklyn-beckham-looks-to-drop-prestigious-photography-class-just-months-after-starting/ Aspiring photographer Brooklyn Beckham reportedly dropped out of his photography class just months after crossing the pond to study. The 18-year-old moved to New York City last year, where he has been taking a course at the prestigious Parsons School of Design since August. But British media are now suggesting that David and Victoria Beckham’s […]]]>


Aspiring photographer Brooklyn Beckham reportedly dropped out of his photography class just months after crossing the pond to study.

The 18-year-old moved to New York City last year, where he has been taking a course at the prestigious Parsons School of Design since August. But British media are now suggesting that David and Victoria Beckham’s eldest son is considering giving up in favor of an internship with a prominent photographer.

He has apparently received a number of offers from various people, as well as bigwigs in the industry, who have promised to take young talent under their wing. Beckham would weigh his options to determine where he would be best placed.

For someone relatively new to the industry, Beckham already has a number of professional accomplishments under his belt, including filming a Burberry campaign and releasing a photo book – the latter of which received extensive reviews for his “gruesome photos and even worse captions”.

Continuing education in creative subjects has been the subject of many discussions in recent years, the relevance of which has been questioned. In an industry so heavily dictated by the mantra of “who you know, not what you know,” should Beckham abandon his course in favor of first-hand experience with working photographers?

Main picture by Daring james Going through Unsplash.


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