black white – Potere Fotografico http://poterefotografico.com/ Sat, 26 Mar 2022 16:26:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://poterefotografico.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-28.png black white – Potere Fotografico http://poterefotografico.com/ 32 32 Art review: There’s a lot to read between the lines at the Rockland exhibition https://poterefotografico.com/art-review-theres-a-lot-to-read-between-the-lines-at-the-rockland-exhibition/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 09:00:24 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/art-review-theres-a-lot-to-read-between-the-lines-at-the-rockland-exhibition/ The line is arguably the most fundamental tool in art, the cornerstone of drawing and painting, and an indispensable device for conveying perspective, depth, and dimension. Abstract expressionism is a possible exception, although even some of this depends on the line for its rhythm and energy (see Jackson Pollock). Paul Klee said: “A line is […]]]>

The line is arguably the most fundamental tool in art, the cornerstone of drawing and painting, and an indispensable device for conveying perspective, depth, and dimension. Abstract expressionism is a possible exception, although even some of this depends on the line for its rhythm and energy (see Jackson Pollock). Paul Klee said: “A line is a point that has wandered. And oh, what varied paths the line travels in “Walk the Line,” through May 8 at the Center for Maine Contemporary Art in Rockland.

The eight artists whose work is on display span a variety of media, including assemblage, artist books, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture and textiles. However, regardless of the medium in which they work, the line – expressed as a mark moving from point to point or as a means of defining geometric shapes – is of primary concern.

The show begins with sublimely serene works by Los Angeles-based John Houck, whose connection to Maine is the Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture, where he spent part of 2008. When I say sublime, I mean that They are incredibly delicate and beautiful, with colors that seem to instantly calm your mind.

However, you might be surprised that the more you look at Houck’s pieces, the more confusing they seem and the more they disturb your sense of serenity. The only thing you can be sure of is that these are archival pigment prints that Houck crumpled up once before framing them. Sounds simple, right? Not at all. Houck paints geometric compositions then photographs them before crumpling the print. Still think it’s simple?

Consider “Accumulator #34.2, 3 colors each #009AB2, #F7BA9E, #F86367” (the numbers refer to the specific Hex colors it uses). Is the image we are looking at just a wrinkled photo of a painting? Or did Houck start by constructing a collage of crumpled papers that cast the shadows we perceive, then photograph the collage and crumple the resulting print? Are the blue tape fragments really on the surface of the print or were they elements of an original collage? If the initial work was painted, did he then apply the tape before photographing it?

You could spend hours trying to figure it out, but there’s something deeply beautiful about the way these works convey a sense of mystery and otherworldliness to Riddle-of-the-Sphinx.

Grace DeGennaro, left to right, “Emanation (Dusk),” “Emanation (Night),” “Emanation (Dawn),” all 2021, oil and cold wax on linen

Grace DeGennaro’s “Emanation” paintings (“Dusk”, “Night”, and “Dawn”) also require prolonged contemplation to be fully appreciated. They are superficially simple. In all, a white circle in the center floats within a green square which in turn floats within a blue circle. Surrounding this central element are marbled fields of shaded color signifying the different times of day in their titles: red fading to orange (“Dusk”), impenetrable black (“Night”), and yellow seeping into golden orange (“Dawn”). From each white circle radiate lines made of hand-applied dots.

But don’t be fooled. The more you look, the more you’ll notice that the lines of one work presage the washes of color in the next, effectively but subtly moving us through the daytime footage of our days. To wit: The dots in the radiating lines in “Dusk” are black and white like a starry night sky, and the yellow dots in “Night” indicate the sun emerging above the horizon in “Dawn.”

There are also other possible readings. The radiating lines superimpose the cosmic patterns and the sacred geometry of the universe. They all emanate from what could be the white void of emptiness from which all manifestation arises. They can also be mandalas whose function is to focus our attention and induce a meditative state.

Jeff Kellar is well known for his formalist geometric abstractions. It uses blocky flat lines and colors to telegraph a deceptive sense of dimensionality. All depict walls and corners in space, and it’s fascinating to see the versatility he achieves simply through the use of straight lines up and down or diagonally across the canvases. It is also surprising to feel the feeling of confinement inspired in particular by the murals. There is no passage through these walls; the spectator must go around them to resume the directional movement.

Jennie C. Jones, “Score for Sustained Blackness,” 2016; collage, acrylic and ink on paper in 10 parts

Jennie C. Jones primarily deploys vertical lines of varying lengths and spacings to create graphic “scores.” Using collages, acrylics and ink on paper, they seem to trace, like an electrocardiogram impression or the sound rhythms followed by an LED screen on your stereo, the pulsations, rhythms and syncopations of the jazz and other black musical forms.

It should be noted that it is rare to find a woman, let alone a woman of color, working in a cool, minimalist trend of geometric abstraction dominated by white men. His “Score for Sustained Blackness” is therefore a kind of revolutionary act that upends our assumptions about who does this kind of work and what is the meaning, if any, of the nickname “Black art”.

Not all lines in the show are drawn or painted. Philippine-born artist Paolo Arao makes sewn fabric “paintings” from scrap textiles and hand-dyed materials. They are, of course, all about geometry and line – thick rectangular swatches, thinner strips, square and triangular cuts, etc.

Paolo Arao, “Evolving Quilt Project”, in progress; stitched canvas, corduroy, cotton, denim, silk, wool

But more subliminally, they explore ideas of queerness. Geometric abstraction is, in its broadest sense, a genre that emphasizes control, rigor, and formal structure. It is mathematical and intellectual. By using fabric instead of pencils or paint, Arao softens this rigidity and constriction and challenges the meaning of “straight”, both literally and in terms of sexuality.

Of course, the explosion of color acknowledges the rich diversity of human experience. Arao also said her work referenced the textile arts of the Philippines and African-American quilting. Yet, even though he was only a child when the AIDS Memorial Quilt Project started in 1985 (he was born in 1977), Arao surely also alludes – particularly in “Evolving Quilt Project” – to the tapestry of 54 tons displaying nearly 50,000 signs commemorating the death toll from another pandemic that many only dimly remember today.

Will Sears’ works depict the line using narrow strips cut from weathered signs (he was a sign painter for years and is still in love with the form), which he alternates with smooth strips of wood pure and brilliant color. These assemblages are painstakingly precise, but the peeling paint segments give them an intriguing folk art quality that makes them instantly accessible. They are painstakingly and meticulously assembled in a labor-intensive process that produces a myriad of effects.

Will Sears, left to right, “Canopy I,” “Canopy II,” both from 2020; oil enamel, wood assembly

“Canopy I” and “Canopy II” have a strong sense of dimension that comes both from their shapes and from the use of a fluorescent red line that makes them appear like two-dimensional neon signs advertising a motel or a roadside bar. He also said they contain “hidden codes of life”, possibly some of the same codes and systems that Arao tries to disrupt in his fabric paintings.

For his “Convergence Series”, Clint Fulkerson makes colorful drawings with wavy lines using vector graphics software to reproduce the rhythms of nature. “Convergence Series 4 #3” feels like a dizzying vortex pulling you in. “Convergence Series 8 #6” looks like waves in a magnetic field.

Finally, don’t leave without leafing through Paula McCartney’s artist books. My favorite: the one that shows luminous patterns on a wall that she reproduces in white ceramic. The unglazed black stoneware pieces on the table are more obviously linked to the line. Yet the poetry of giving shape to something as ephemeral as light is an unexpected coda of the show.

Jorge S. Arango has been writing about art, design and architecture for over 35 years. He lives in Portland. He can be reached at: [email protected]


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5 photography ideas you must try in 2022 https://poterefotografico.com/5-photography-ideas-you-must-try-in-2022/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 17:00:05 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/5-photography-ideas-you-must-try-in-2022/ If you are into photography, there is no doubt that you want to know the best ways to improve your photography. There are countless blogs and articles on this subject alone; what I’m going to do is drop five ideas that might help you get better at photography. Trying something new also means finding your […]]]>


If you are into photography, there is no doubt that you want to know the best ways to improve your photography. There are countless blogs and articles on this subject alone; what I’m going to do is drop five ideas that might help you get better at photography.

Trying something new also means finding your style and becoming the photographer you want to be. So, try these five ideas with your photography in 2022 to see if they help you grow as an artist.

Sharpen your composition

Shoot with a single objective. There are times when we think more is better: more food, more friends, more clothes. This also applies to photographic equipment – more lenses mean we can shoot anything. However, sometimes having fewer options can actually make us better photographers. When we only have one lens on our camera (or one option for composition), we’re forced to think more about how to frame our shot to make it interesting. This exercise can hone your composition skills and get you excited about single-lens shooting. Taking photos with just one lens might seem limited, but it actually helps you hone your composition skills. Rather than being tempted to move around and change angles, you stay put and hone your framing technique. You will quickly notice a multitude of different compositions available from the same vantage point, so choose carefully when composing your image. It will also force you to slow down and think about what you’re doing, making sure what you want is in the frame or deciding whether moving further back or forward would improve the front image. press the shutter button. Most importantly, it will get you out of the rut and make you feel like a beginner again, this is when we all learn the most!

Keep it simple with monochrome

Try monochrome. Black and white photography is no longer just for film cameras. Most modern cameras have black and white settings built in. Black and white shooting instantly removes all color distractions and makes everything simple and easy to watch. Photographs do not always have to be colored; in fact, black and white images can be some of the most spectacular photographs you can create. Lack of color can draw more attention to important elements of an image.

Of course, when shooting raw, all the hues available in the scene will be captured, so you just need to set your preview to monochrome. However, if you are still shooting raw for the extended editing possibilities, be even more courageous and shoot only in monochrome JPEG, as this will really push your choice of subject and composition, as the editing scope is somewhat reduced.

Change your point of view

Try to photograph a new subject in a very different orientation. Don’t just pull it straight or at an angle. Shoot your subject from a higher or lower angle, or even try shooting in the shade. If you shoot mainly in landscape orientation, try to limit yourself to shooting only in portrait orientation. This will allow you to focus on what’s important in your scene and how the elements in your scene interact with each other to create your composition.

Spontaneity

Shoot quickly and spontaneously. Go beyond the idea that every image should be perfect or carefully composed so that it can live on forever on your Facebook page or Instagram wall. Sometimes spontaneity leads to that perfect shot. Don’t think about it too much! The best photos are often captured without any thought or planning. Sure, you can end up with weird angles or bad lighting conditions, but nothing will be able to beat that raw emotion that pours into you when you’re right in the moment with no ulterior motive. Sometimes the best photos you can take are the ones that happen spontaneously. You don’t have to spend forever finding the perfect shot. You just have to be there when it happens. And it’s not that difficult if you’re ready to shoot quickly and spontaneously.

Rest

Take some time to film, then come back to see how your worldview has changed. Take a class, read a book, go on vacation, do something that makes you feel differently about the world around you. Anyone can improve their photography skills by trying something new every now and then. Try for at least a week without taking your camera. You will be amazed at how much you can learn about the world around you without trying to capture it on camera. And when you get back to filming, you’ll have a fresh outlook to see things in a new light.

Conclusion

You might be wondering why you should try new concepts and ideas for your photography. Ultimately, it can only serve to improve yourself as a photographer. These ideas have been around for years, if not decades. By trying out these ideas, not only do you develop your own craft, but you also open yourself up to a new way of thinking. And if nothing else, this new approach could elevate the quality of your photography from simple images to ones that convey greater meaning.

You might discover a new love for shooting in monochrome or indulging in your camera to let spontaneity in your images. You should push yourself to try new things. That doesn’t mean you have to stop filming in black and white or that you only have to shoot big to capture the whole scene. This means that you have to keep an open mind to new ideas and possibilities for photography.

The most important thing to remember here is not to judge yourself or others too harshly. Everyone has their strengths and weaknesses, and we all try to improve at what we do. Also, keep in mind that this is just a starting point for you, not the definitive guide to great photography. Do your own research, take your own photos, try out different techniques and enjoy. It’s a creative field we’re talking about, after all; there should always be room for creativity and growth.


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The best photography books of 2021 | Books https://poterefotografico.com/the-best-photography-books-of-2021-books/ Sun, 05 Dec 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/the-best-photography-books-of-2021-books/ IDuring colonial times, European settlers from Brazil viewed the snake-infested and malarious Amazon jungle as a “green hell”. The superb of Sebastião Salgado Amazonia (Taschen) sees it as a black and white paradise, or as a paradise in the process of being lost – not closed to unworthy human beings but hewn up by farmers […]]]>


IDuring colonial times, European settlers from Brazil viewed the snake-infested and malarious Amazon jungle as a “green hell”. The superb of Sebastião Salgado Amazonia (Taschen) sees it as a black and white paradise, or as a paradise in the process of being lost – not closed to unworthy human beings but hewn up by farmers and churned by mining. Salgado mythologizes the landscapes he photographs, and his documentation of six years in the Amazon looks like a cover of the first week of Genesis. As the torrential rains recede from the smoldering, seemingly molten earth, the dry earth solidifies; the tribes come out of the river and begin to grow and multiply; the alliance of the creator with his biodiverse creation is renewed by a rainbow which arches above the mountains.

‘Perverse Paintings’: Lauren Hutton, Miami, 1989, after Helmut Newton’s Legacy. Photography: © Helmut Newton Foundation, Berlin

Salgado portrays the Amazonian natives as noble savages, innocent yet surprisingly stylish with their feathered headdresses and patterned face paintings. Ejected from Eden, their descendants of the last days perform erotic warlike dances in Helmut Newton’s play. Heritage (Taschen). Newton, who liked to reduce his sophisticated female subjects to a primitive state, saw clothing as fetish clothing that revealed the body rather than covering it up. The models were undressed after the end of the show, then ordered to resume their poses of strutting: is their bare skin also a disguise? Jerry Hall squeezes a rare slice of beef to his face, and another model shows off the Bvlgari jewelry on his wrists and fingers while chopping up an uncooked chicken. In Newton’s perverse paintings, beauty is an act of violence, an armed assault on nature.

Matt black’s American geography: an account with a dream (Thames & Hudson) is a tragic atlas, documenting long months on the road in impoverished parts of the country. The palette is austere, inky black and icy white, with flocks of evil Hitchcockian birds masking a faded or ashy sky. If the sun is shining, it shines on junk liquor bottles, and the music that accompanies Black’s hesitant progress is made by the squeaking of plastic seats on a Greyhound bus. When the western horizons open up, space seems desolate, not overwhelmingly primordial like the Amazon of Salgado. Still, the photographs lend a stoic dignity to these exiles of America’s brilliant promise, and Black’s diary notes reveal how compassionately he listened to their casual tales of doom.

Novice monks wearing face shields at Wat Molilokkayram Buddhist temple in Bangkok, April 2020, from the year that changed our world
Novice monks wearing face shields at Wat Molilokkayram Buddhist temple in Bangkok in April 2020, the year that changed our world. Photograph: Lillian Suwanrumpha / AFP

The year that changed our world (Thames & Hudson) tells the story of the pandemic in vivid, sometimes lacerating colors. It begins by exhibiting something that no one wants to see, as a cyclist passing through Wuhan ostensibly ignores a corpse slumped in the street. Surrealist quirks soon captivate the eye. Indian policeman wears spiky red coronavirus blast as helmet; in Virginia, mannequins in evening dress occupy alternate tables in a chic restaurant to enforce social distancing. Towards the end, the nave of Salisbury Cathedral becomes a vaccination clinic, while at the Barcelona Opera House, a string quartet serenades an audience of 2,000 potted plants. Both shows are post-apocalyptic but somehow reassuring: religious faith gives way to medical science and the greenery inherited from the mistreated Earth.


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The best art and photography books to buy this summer https://poterefotografico.com/the-best-art-and-photography-books-to-buy-this-summer/ https://poterefotografico.com/the-best-art-and-photography-books-to-buy-this-summer/#respond Tue, 10 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/the-best-art-and-photography-books-to-buy-this-summer/ From English landscapes to apocalyptic raves, we bring together the most exciting photographic outings for Buy now August 10, 2021 Pointe Island published by IDEA Transporting you to one of the most legendary concerts of the 1990s, this new book from IDEA documents the legendary Stone Roses concert. The event – held on the man-made […]]]>


From English landscapes to apocalyptic raves, we bring together the most exciting photographic outings for Buy now


Pointe Island published by IDEA

Transporting you to one of the most legendary concerts of the 1990s, this new book from IDEA documents the legendary Stone Roses concert. The event – held on the man-made island of Spike in Widnes, Cheshire, in May 1990 – is billed as “indie rock met dance in the third summer of love” night. . Offering a visual encyclopedia of ’90s British street style, the book’s irreverent pages focus on the young people who made up the crowd of 30,000 fans, with photographs by Dave Swindells, Patrick Harrison and Peter J Walsh, and Juergen Teller.

British Isles by Jamie Hawkesworth, published by MACK

Jamie Hawkesworth’s magnificent 310-page book documents 13 years of travels through the British Isles. Capturing schoolchildren and traders, professionals and priests, as well as distinctively British landscapes, estates and towns, the new title released by MACK offers a warm and diverse portrayal of life in the UK. “The spirit of the whole book was never to try to sum up these different cities, it was the fact that I could get on a train and go somewhere new,” Hawkesworth told AnOther last month. .

Desert Nudes by Lorena Lohr

Best known for her dreamy and melancholy photos of the American Southwest, Lorena Lohr’s latest project sees the image designer swapping her camera for the paintbrush, presenting a book of nude paintings that depict women “in dialogue with the world. natural ‘desert.

American demonstration. Photos 2020-2021 by Mel D. Cole, published by Damiani

Mel D. Cole’s moving new book documents the Black Lives Matter protests that swept across America last year following the murder of George Floyd. “Turning the Black Lives Matter movement is the most important job of my entire life,” Cole said. The book is shot in a black and white documentary style, inspired by photographs of civil rights events in the 1960s. “It meant the world to me to document and render this service. This is what I have, this is what I can bring, and this is my eye, my platform for telling stories.

Jeans by Alastair McKimm

This fad has filled the editor’s new zine of username, Alastair McKimm, celebrates the creative potential of denim. Entitled Jeans, the publication features an array of denim-centric images from some of the industry’s best-known photographers, including Willy Vanderperre, Inez & Vinoodh, Mario Sorrenti, Craig McDean, David Sims, Julien Martinez Leclerc, Paolo Roversi and many others.

Commission by Katsu Naito and Jason Rider

Marking the debut of Commission’s first menswear collection, founders and designers Dylan Cao, Huy Luong and Jin Kay teamed up with New York photographer Katsu Naito and stylist Jason Rider on a stunning book of black photographs. and White, which features a cast of all-Asian streetcast men. All proceeds from the sale of the book will support APEX for Youth and AALDEF.

summer farewell by Joanna Wzorek

Shot in the summer of 2020, just after last year’s first lockdown was lifted, Joanna Wzorek’s sun-drenched zine summer farewell is an ode to Poland and the country’s natural wealth. “Most of them were shot in the countryside,” the photographer told us last month. “I just visited some friends… and we took a little road trip, walking through and noticing things through the windows. It was quite spontaneous and actually a very happy experience.

New York, New York by Marie Tomanova, published by Hatje Cantz Verlag

Hailing from a small town in the Czech Republic, Marie Tomanova’s photography explores “displacement, place, community, self and memory” through the prism of American youth culture. His latest book, New York, New York, focuses on youth in America’s cultural epicenter, documenting the wild nights and carefree days of the city’s youth in the lively and spontaneous style of Tomanova.

Lizard Point ’99 by Luke Overin and Jerry O’Driscoll

Luke Overin and Jerry O’Driscoll’s Book Lizard Point ’99 captures a drug-fueled End of the World-style rave in Cornwall, which took place in the closing months of the last millennium, during a unique solar eclipse. O’Driscoll’s photographs from the 1999 doomsday rave were released last month, after being left untouched in his attic for more than 20 years.

Equipment by Jet Swan, published by Loose Joints

The first book of photographs by the Yorkshire-born artist Jet Swan, Equipment, compiles eerily beautiful portraits of strangers, which were taken over a three-year period in temporary studios across the UK. Blending street photography with Swan’s intimate and intimate style, the book’s piercing portraits explore the tension between our public and private indoor lives.

Vacation by Judith Black, published by Stanley Barker Books

The tender book of Judith Black Vacation captures a roadtrip in 1986 across America with her four children. Rather than documenting America itself, the title offers a loving snapshot of shared moments with family and friends on the road, across the landscapes of New York, Chicago, San Francisco, and places in between. “Sweet memories and stories embedded in every photograph,” explains the photographer of the book.


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Best Film Photography Books | IndieWire https://poterefotografico.com/best-film-photography-books-indiewire/ https://poterefotografico.com/best-film-photography-books-indiewire/#respond Tue, 08 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/best-film-photography-books-indiewire/ A collection of reading material needed for anyone who appreciates the art of film photography. All products and services presented by IndieWire are independently selected by IndieWire publishers. However, IndieWire may receive a commission on orders placed through its retail links, and the retailer may receive certain verifiable data for accounting purposes. Photography is full […]]]>


A collection of reading material needed for anyone who appreciates the art of film photography.

All products and services presented by IndieWire are independently selected by IndieWire publishers. However, IndieWire may receive a commission on orders placed through its retail links, and the retailer may receive certain verifiable data for accounting purposes.

Photography is full of lessons – on framing, lighting, depth of field – that filmmakers shoot all the time. If you are thinking of getting into the field, film photography books are a great way to help you improve your art. Whether you’re currently in photography school or just interested in the genre, you can’t go wrong stocking up on the necessary reading material. Below are seven film photography books that any photographer can draw inspiration from, and for other reading recommendations, check out our list of the best screenwriting books and essential books for TV screenwriters. For additional buying suggestions, check out our list of durable film cameras and the best cameras for every budget.

“The Handbook of Film Photography” by Chris Marquardt and Monika Andrae

If you are interested in film photography, the “Handbook of Film Photography” is a good place to start. Authors Chris Marquardt and Monika Andrae provide a comprehensive and easy-to-understand filmmaking resource that includes important differences between film and digital photography, film formats, film cameras to buy, and how to shoot and process films. black and white films. at home. This updated and expanded edition of 2019 covers topics such as the hybrid film / digital workflow, scanning negatives, as well as using smartphones for light metering and to help with film processing.

“Medium Format Film Photography” by Jeff Stefan

A solid choice for amateurs, “medium format film photography” goes beyond the world of 35mm film. The book includes the essentials of film photography, different medium format cameras to use, how to adjust the exposure on your camera using a light meter, develop black and white negatives, photograph, digitally negatives and how to convert your negatives to positives in Lightroom, and process your images.

“Mastering Film Photography: A Definitive Guide for Photographers” by Chris Gatcum

“Mastering Film Photography” will give you a quick guide to emulsion shooting in the digital age. The book offers a crash course in how film works, choosing the right camera, and the challenges of getting the right exposure when there’s no instant feedback. Also featured in the book: How to Use Flash Systems in the Pre-TTL Era, the Importance of Instagram Front Filters, and the World of Lensless Photography.

“The Art of Photography: A Personal Approach to Artistic Expression” by Bruce Barnham

Although not explicitly film photography, “The Art of Photography: A Personal Approach to Artistic Expression” is still worth reading. Originally published in 1994 and first revised in 2010, the book contains nearly 200 beautiful black and white and color photographs, as well as numerous tables, charts and tables, introducing the world of photography to photographers. beginners, intermediates and advanced.

“What they didn’t teach you at photo school” by Demetrius Fordham

From talented hobbyist to respected professional, “What they didn’t teach you in photography school: the trade secrets that will make you successful in the industry” reveals the trade secrets for creating your own brand and your own business. The book is packed with hard-learned lessons from author Demetrius Fordham’s successful career as a commercial, editorial and lifestyle photographer. Tips from the book include how to land the best internships and assistant positions, and develop an incredible portfolio to lay the foundation for your own successful career.

Ansel Adams’ “Camera”

Ansel Adams, the late photographer behind some of the 20th century’s most iconic photos, has written a trio of illustrated books to help harness the creative potential of any photographer. “The Camera”, which is the first in the series, offers a timeless masterclass acquired over a lifetime of photography. It covers 35mm, medium, and large format cameras, and offers in-depth guidance on camera components such as lenses, shutters, and light meters.

“The Negative” deals with artificial and natural light, film and exhibition, darkroom equipment and techniques. Finally, “The Print” offers a step-by-step guide through everything from designing and furnishing a darkroom, to editing and displaying your photographs, to making your first print and mastery of advanced techniques. The illustrated guide is packed with essential darkroom techniques and tips, and shows how engraving can be used expressively to enhance an image. You can buy all three books for around $ 70.

“Photography by Film: How to Develop Analog Photography Films” by Eric Anderson

Digital photography has become the most popular genre, but analog photography is an art form that is still worth pursuing. Eric Anderson’s “Film Photography: How to Develop Analog Photography Films” teaches you how to process and develop analog films, even if you have no previous experience. Readers will learn how easy it is to develop black and white film at home (including the necessary equipment), the cost of processing the film, how to feed the film, how to fix and dry the film, as well as how scan negatives, colorize analog images and much more.

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97% discount on the online package (UK offer) https://poterefotografico.com/97-discount-on-the-online-package-uk-offer/ https://poterefotografico.com/97-discount-on-the-online-package-uk-offer/#respond Fri, 21 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/97-discount-on-the-online-package-uk-offer/ Prices and availability of the offer may change after the publication date. TL; DR: The Photography Side Business Bundle is on sale for £ 20.46 from May 21, saving you 97% off the list price. Just having a compact camera doesn’t make a photographer. While equipment is a necessary part of the trade, much of […]]]>



Prices and availability of the offer may change after the publication date.

TL; DR: The Photography Side Business Bundle is on sale for £ 20.46 from May 21, saving you 97% off the list price.


Just having a compact camera doesn’t make a photographer. While equipment is a necessary part of the trade, much of the work is done without a camera in hand, especially editing photographs or training your eye in the moment to capture the best possible picture. And if you want to turn your passion for images into a secondary (or even primary) activity, fundamental business knowledge will also be essential.

To master the real fundamentals of photography, as well as learn the principles of starting a business from scratch, consider taking an online course or two, like this Side Photography Business Pack, on sale at price of £ 20.46.

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This is one of the most comprehensive virtual lessons we’ve seen to date, covering 10 key courses in Outdoor Photography, Travel, Portrait, Long Exposure, DSLRs, Nikon and Camera. black and white photography, plus lessons specifically focused on retouching and editing in Adobe Lightroom Classic and Photoshop. Plus, it even provides a step-by-step guide to starting your own photography business.

Classes are led by professional photography professionals, Phil Ebner and Marcin Mikus, who provide information, real projects, and insider tips that help you shoot and edit like a seasoned pro. Phil is a leading instructor on Udemy, who has taught over a million students since his debut in 2012, while Marcin is a professional retoucher specializing in training students at Adobe CC. Together, they strike a good balance between creative mentoring and professional technique.

By the end of your training, you will have all the basics you will need to start your own business. Considering that the Side Photography Business Bundle is on sale for just £ 20.46, we think it’s money well spent.

Credit: Pexels


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Is photography an art? | digital camera world https://poterefotografico.com/is-photography-an-art-digital-camera-world/ Sat, 01 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/is-photography-an-art-digital-camera-world/ Is photography an art? It’s a good question and if you were hoping for a definitive answer here, I’m afraid I’ll have to disappoint you. This is partly because there is no definitive answer to the question and also because any suggestion one way or another is likely to set off a chain reaction of […]]]>

Is photography an art? It’s a good question and if you were hoping for a definitive answer here, I’m afraid I’ll have to disappoint you. This is partly because there is no definitive answer to the question and also because any suggestion one way or another is likely to set off a chain reaction of opinion too large for our comments section can handle it.

And it’s true – art is totally subjective. What one person calls a masterpiece, another scoffs at the kind of chin-chin disdain one usually associates with a reviewer, who wears tartan pants and a bun. But the truth is that there are a lot of misunderstandings about the a function of an image – it’s what I believe ultimately defines the line between creative work and just a light map of the tones of a scene.

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Rizzoli to publish photography books for AvGeeks and celebrities https://poterefotografico.com/rizzoli-to-publish-photography-books-for-avgeeks-and-celebrities/ https://poterefotografico.com/rizzoli-to-publish-photography-books-for-avgeeks-and-celebrities/#respond Fri, 09 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/rizzoli-to-publish-photography-books-for-avgeeks-and-celebrities/ Aviation geeks, photographers and fans of popular culture will want to keep an eye out for two hardcover volumes coming out this month from Italian publisher Rizzoli. Known for publishing coffee table-worthy books filled with incredible art and photography, Rizzoli publishes Paris seen from the sky April 13 and Come fly with me: fly in […]]]>


Aviation geeks, photographers and fans of popular culture will want to keep an eye out for two hardcover volumes coming out this month from Italian publisher Rizzoli.

Known for publishing coffee table-worthy books filled with incredible art and photography, Rizzoli publishes Paris seen from the sky April 13 and Come fly with me: fly in style may’s beginning.

Come Fly With Me: Fly in Style by Jodi Peckman

Come Fly With Me book cover featuring a celebrity climbing an airplane staircase

Cover of Come Fly With Me: Flying in Style by Jodi Peckman. Image: Mirrorpix / Getty Images

Anyone who misses traveling the world and those old enough to remember the ‘golden age’ of travel – when getting on a plane was a chance to dress up – will appreciate the gorgeous celebrity photos. at airports in this book.

The images are curated by Jodi Peckman, creative director, photo editor and award-winning writer who spent thirty years working with Rolling Stone magazine.

May 12, 1971: Paul McCartney, singer, songwriter and bassist of the recently disbanded Beatles, with wife Linda (1941 - 1998) and their two children, Mary (left) and Heather (right) at Gatwick Airport .  Image: Central Press / Getty Images

May 12, 1971: Paul McCartney, singer, songwriter and bassist of the recently disbanded Beatles, with wife Linda (1941 – 1998) and their two children, Mary (left) and Heather (right) at Gatwick Airport . Image: Central Press / Getty Images

“My interest in these kinds of images started with a photo of Paul and Linda McCartney arriving at the airport in the early 1970s,” Peckman explains in the book’s preface. “I liked everything about it. A look at a famous family in such a public space, they look so natural.

F3K5AM MUHAMMAD ALI (Casius Clay) American boxer arriving at Heathrow Airport circa 1967. Image: Pictorial Press Ltd / Alamy Stock Photo

MUHAMMAD ALI (Casius Clay) American boxer arriving at Heathrow Airport circa 1967. Image: Pictorial Press Ltd / Alamy Stock Photo

Thanks to Peckman and the perseverance of the paparazzi, we can sit at home, plan our post-pandemic trips, and browse 80 color and black and white images of celebrities past and present including Dolly Parton, Muhammad Ali, Prince, Taylor Swift and many others as they pass through airport terminals around the world.

R7WFC9 Country and Western singer Dolly Parton leaving Heathrow Airport after her popular appearance at the Country and Western Music Festival in Wembley.

Country and western singer Dolly Parton leaving Heathrow Airport after her popular appearance at the Country and Western music festival in Wembley. Image: Bettmann

Paris seen from the sky, by Jeffrey Milstein

Jeffrey Milstein is a photographer, architect and pilot you may know from art exhibitions and previous books featuring stunning images from below of planes taken as they fly directly over the runways of airport, as well as New York and Los Angeles, taken from above.

For Paris seen from the sky, Milstein had to convince the French authorities to give him permission to take his signature high-resolution photos while flying over Paris and Versailles in a helicopter. It was not easy.

Cover of the book Paris from the sky showing an aerial view of the Eiffel Tower

Cover of Paris Seen from the Sky, by Jeffrey Milstein. Image: Jeffrey Milstein and Rizzoli

“At first the helicopter company, Helifirst – they do all the flying for movies like Impossible mission – told me that we could only circle around the city and that flying over the city was impossible, ”says Milstein. He persisted, paid hefty fees to file an application, and asked publishers, museum curators and other members of the photography community to write letters of support. Then he waited for a response which officials said might – or might not – come in three months.

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He continues: “I went to Paris at the end of the three months hoping to get permission. And on the last day of my stay, I learned that they had given me two 45 minute flights over Paris.

“They asked me not to photograph Notre-Dame which was covered with scaffolding.”

Milstein extended his stay and made the first flight, north of the Seine. He returned a month later to make the second flight south of the Seine, with an additional flight over Charles de Gaulle airport.

“I also got permission from Versailles, which is also hardly ever given,” Milstein explains. “In the fall, I went to Paris and did another flight over Versailles, where they turned on the lights for me.”

Aerial photographs, architecture, habitat, ports, airports, marinas, Versailles

Versailles. Image: Jeffrey Milstein and Rizzoli

But how did he get these shots?

“For aerial shots from a helicopter, an image stabilizer lens or camera is a big help, especially if there is vibration or wind turbulence,” says Milstein. “At the end of the day when the sun is low, the warm colors are nice and the long shadows help create drama and define the image. After the sun goes down, when the lights come on but there is still light, this is also a great time to take photos.

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Featured image credited to Bettmann


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Louis Vuitton launches two new travel photography books https://poterefotografico.com/louis-vuitton-launches-two-new-travel-photography-books/ https://poterefotografico.com/louis-vuitton-launches-two-new-travel-photography-books/#respond Wed, 24 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/louis-vuitton-launches-two-new-travel-photography-books/ Louis Vuitton has added two new additions to its “Fashion Eye” book series, which invites artists from around the world to create travel diaries, illustrations and photographs dedicated to a country, region, city or place. This spring, Louis Vuitton adds Kyoto by Mayumi Hosokura and Normandie by Jean Moral. According to the brand, photographer Mayumi […]]]>


Louis Vuitton has added two new additions to its “Fashion Eye” book series, which invites artists from around the world to create travel diaries, illustrations and photographs dedicated to a country, region, city or place.

This spring, Louis Vuitton adds Kyoto by Mayumi Hosokura and Normandie by Jean Moral.

According to the brand, photographer Mayumi Hosokura explores the contrast of her hometown of Kyoto in Japan, revealing both its ancient past as an imperial capital and its vibrant modernity today.

“Seen through his lens, the shadows of the trees coexist with diaphanous bodies adorned with tattoos. Mayumi Hosokura elegantly portrays the little-known secrets of Kyoto, bathed in silence away from tourism and urban bustle, ”Louis Vuitton said in a statement.

The second book focuses on the Normandy beach region in northern France, with photographs taken by illustrator and graphic designer Jean Moral in the 1930s. Initially, on assignment for Harper’s Bazaar in 1933, Moral is said to have: “immortalized Normandy in photos taken during the winter. Her black and white photographs provide an intimate perspective of passengers and crew, all in support of the star, the ship itself, creating an absolutely fascinating and timeless journey.

Originally launched in 2016, the ‘Fashion Eye’ book series celebrates the art of travel synonymous with Louis Vuitton and includes Saint Tropez, Ukraine, Morocco, Iran, Shanghai, India, Greece , Bali, California and the Silk Road, to name but a few.

Images: Louis Vuitton


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Cochrane woman aims for gold at ‘Olympic Games in Photographic Art’ https://poterefotografico.com/cochrane-woman-aims-for-gold-at-olympic-games-in-photographic-art/ https://poterefotografico.com/cochrane-woman-aims-for-gold-at-olympic-games-in-photographic-art/#respond Sun, 24 Jan 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/cochrane-woman-aims-for-gold-at-olympic-games-in-photographic-art/ Breadcrumb Links New Local News Cochrane Photographer Vies for Gold in International Photo Competition for Calgary Under COVID-19 Lockdown Author of the article: Jason Herring Release date : January 24, 2021 • January 24, 2021 • 2 minutes to read • Join the conversation Jacquie Matechuk poses for a photo in Cochrane. Matachuk is a […]]]>


Cochrane Photographer Vies for Gold in International Photo Competition for Calgary Under COVID-19 Lockdown

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A Cochrane photographer is in the running for a gold medal in a prestigious international photo competition representing Calgary during the COVID-19 lockdown last spring.

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Jacquie Matechuk is a finalist with Team Canada at the 2021 Photographic World Cup, a competition which she says is considered the “Olympic Games of the Art of Photography”.

The competition involves 38 countries from around the world, each hosting a selection of the country’s best shots in six different categories taken by photographers from all over the country. A bronze, silver and gold medal is awarded in each category by a jury.

Four Canadian photographers, including Matechuk, are vying for a spot on the podium after the finalists were announced last week. She races in the “Commercial” category, which encompasses a range of styles, competing with photographers from as far away as Brazil, Russia and New Zealand.

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“It’s so wide. It’s everything from fashion to marketing materials, things you find in magazines, product advertising to architecture. So it was pretty neat to see the submissions from all the different countries because everyone has a different influence and a different environment, ”she said. “It’s a very interesting and fun challenge to be a part of it.”

The nominated photo of Matechuk is a black and white depiction of the Telus Sky building in downtown Calgary from street level, towering above the viewer.

Jacquie Matechuk's photo of the Telus Sky building during Calgary's COVID-19 lockdown in April 2020 is a finalist in the 'Commercial' category at the 2021 Photographic World Cup.
Jacquie Matechuk’s photo of the Telus Sky building during Calgary’s COVID-19 lockdown in April 2020 is a finalist in the ‘Commercial’ category at the 2021 Photographic World Cup. Photo by Jacquie Matechuk

She said it was shot in mid-April, about a month after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, at the height of public health restrictions that kept all but essential workers at home. She wanted to capture the eerie stillness of the city’s normally bustling heart.

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“I didn’t see a vehicle, I didn’t see people in the park, people on Stephen Avenue, it was just weird. I ended up staying a lot longer than I thought I would, just me and the buildings. It was pretty neat, ”said Matechuk.

“I don’t know if I would have had the same appreciation for the ambiance and the beauty of some of these buildings if it hadn’t been so apocalyptic there. It was literally a city for a million, which was laid bare for me to play with, that’s almost how I felt. “

The medals will be presented at a ceremony in Rome, Italy on April 19. Due to COVID-19, it is not yet decided whether the event will take place in person, but event organizers say they are hoping for a face-to-face ceremony.

Another photographer from Alberta is also among the four Canadian finalists. Spruce Grove family physician Dr. Ammara Sadiq is shortlisted for her portrayal of a Swan Lake ballerina.

jherring@postmedia.com

Twitter: @jasonfherring

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