Photographic art – Potere Fotografico http://poterefotografico.com/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 05:27:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://poterefotografico.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-28.png Photographic art – Potere Fotografico http://poterefotografico.com/ 32 32 AI ‘art’ is not a threat – Scot Scoop News https://poterefotografico.com/ai-art-is-not-a-threat-scot-scoop-news/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 05:22:44 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/ai-art-is-not-a-threat-scot-scoop-news/ The term “artificial intelligence” (AI) has become intimidating to many artists. This year, images generated by machine learning programs, including the popular SLAB and Mid Road, have taken over the Internet. The comment sections of posts showing AI talent, however, were filled with people expressing growing concern that artists were being replaced by technology and […]]]>

The term “artificial intelligence” (AI) has become intimidating to many artists. This year, images generated by machine learning programs, including the popular SLAB and Mid Road, have taken over the Internet. The comment sections of posts showing AI talent, however, were filled with people expressing growing concern that artists were being replaced by technology and becoming the next factory workers.

In order to assess the seriousness of the threat these machine learning programs pose to artists and creative minds, it is essential to understand what they are and how they work.

Developer Open AI defines DALL-E 2, the more advanced successor to DALL-E, as an “AI system capable of creating realistic images and artwork from natural language description”. Almost every other AI art system fits this mold. All generators also follow a similar process: a user enters a prompt, and within seconds to minutes, a machine learning algorithm will combine, modify, and form images that match what was written. Simply put, this is possible through the “training” of technology to associate images and their relationships with textual descriptions.

Most people used these programs for casual fun, testing the technology’s capabilities with ridiculous prompts. Certainly, I’ve seen some remarkable results and spent some time learning about the variety of art styles and scenes the AI ​​can render. It’s just as fun to submit a nonsensical or overly complicated prompt and see what the AI ​​will put together.

But the products of artificial intelligence cannot really be considered art. Art aims to invoke emotions, convey a message or represent a concept through creativity and imagination. Therefore, we cannot consider AI-generated images as art, despite their visual impression. These programs use references like we do, but without the independence of a real artist. The “art” of AI is, at best, an extension of the human intellect in its responses to our prompts and, at worst, elaborate plagiarism.

With these definitions in mind, it’s clear that humans are infinitely more valuable as artists than artificial intelligence. Not only do we have the ability to conceptualize, but we can also incorporate abstract ideas – business principles, symbolism and cultural references – into our work.

Artificial intelligence is still too rudimentary to match the intellect of an art school graduate or any human being with a developed brain, for that matter. At least for now, all it can do is imitate our paintings and photographs, reconstructing pre-existing images.

Another possibility is that he could follow in the footsteps of photography in terms of its influence on artwork. Along with photography driving impressionism, AI can push us into a more introspective style of creation.

Undeniably, AI-generated images pose a threat if used to spread misinformation, featured as original creations in art competitions, or other inappropriate activities. Apart from that, however, it is safe to say that until AI gains sensitivity, it will remain a complement to human activities. We need to recognize this technology as a tool that inspires us and helps us create our own visuals, not as a competitor.

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‘Ron’s Place’: driving to save Birkenhead Palace from art brut | Art https://poterefotografico.com/rons-place-driving-to-save-birkenhead-palace-from-art-brut-art/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/rons-place-driving-to-save-birkenhead-palace-from-art-brut-art/ The front room of the late Ron Gittins apartment has a Pompeii Villa of Mysteries vibe. The room could be an Egyptian tomb. The bathroom, an aquarium fever dream. The handcrafted fireplaces include a 3 meter high lion, a minotaur and – in the kitchen – a Roman altar. The interior of Gittins house would […]]]>

The front room of the late Ron Gittins apartment has a Pompeii Villa of Mysteries vibe. The room could be an Egyptian tomb. The bathroom, an aquarium fever dream. The handcrafted fireplaces include a 3 meter high lion, a minotaur and – in the kitchen – a Roman altar.

The interior of Gittins house would stop you anywhere. The fact that no one knew it was there, that he spent decades creating it by stealth in his rented ground floor property in the Merseyside town of Birkenhead, stops you a little longer.

Over the next few weeks, fundraising events will take place to help save “Ron’s” to be lost forever.

Ron Gittins has transformed his Merseyside home with murals inspired by art from ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. Photography: Christopher Thomond/The Guardian

One of the people involved is Jarvis Cocker, who sees Gittins as an alien artist who created things worth preserving.

“We can all relate to people renovating their homes. Everyone decorates their home in one way or another,” Cocker said. “Ron just went the extra mile.”

Cocker said the lion’s head fireplace, painstakingly molded by Gittins using wet concrete, was “really amazing”.

Bedroom
Bedroom in Gittins House with lion head fireplace. Photography: Christopher Thomond/The Guardian
Bedroom
A marine-themed room. Photography: Christopher Thomond/The Guardian

“I’ve always been interested in the art of people who didn’t go through the normal channels, who didn’t go to art college and stuff like that,” he added. “They have an idea and they follow it. We all have creativity within us.

Gittins, a complicated and eccentric character, died in 2019. He left behind a rented apartment filled with bags, boxes, magazines, videos and handwritten notes, some coded. Besides the painted and carved works on the walls and ceilings, there are papier-mâché figures and costumes that he made by hand.

One is the uniform of a Grenadier Guard, which he wore to march up and down, with a papier-mâché musket, past a nursing home he was in conflict with on behalf of his mother.

“People would find him funny, provocative, annoying, but there was also a method to his madness,” said filmmaker Martin Wallace, who makes a feature length documentary on Gittins and sits on the advisory board of Ron’s Place.

As an example, he mentioned the time Gittins entered the center of Birkenhead, his legs tied together and wearing an orange jumpsuit, to protest detentions at Guantánamo.

“It was a very private and deep manifestation,” Wallace said. “He would address people and tell them if he was talking to them, but he wouldn’t reach out to make as much noise as he could.”

Gittins lived a frugal life on disability benefit money. He was always taking lessons, whether in French, German, accounting or industrial sewing.

Gittins had mental health issues and at one point was diagnosed with what would today be called bipolar disorder.

Hanging clothes
Outfits made and worn by Gittins. Photography: Christopher Thomond/The Guardian

But his story is more nuanced than that. Wallace said: “I’ve interviewed loads of people who’ve met him and I say towards the end of the conversation, ‘Do you think Ron had a mental health issue?’ and they look at me like, ‘Are you serious? Of course he didn’t.

Although no one really knows what Gittins was doing in his apartment, he was well known locally and sometimes had artwork commissioned.

Gittins
Ron Gittins died in 2019. Trustees are now campaigning to preserve his home. Photography: Christopher Thomond/The Guardian

“Ron was friends with the fishmonger at Birkenhead Market and he commissioned a painting of him and his brother as Roman invaders in fourth-century Britain, sacrificing a red mullet,” Wallace said.

It is not exposed. “The fishmonger’s wife hates it. It is wrapped in bubble wrap in the garage.

There will be a fair number of people who sympathize with the fishmonger’s wife. They will look at what Gittins has done and think it’s bad art, of little merit – and that’s fine, say his supporters.

The goal isn’t just to preserve Gittins’ work for the sake of preservation, Wallace said. The hope is that it may inspire others.

“What’s remarkable is that everyone who comes here has a kind of childish reaction. There’s something fascinating, challenging and uplifting about that…perhaps also something a little sad.”

The plan is for Ron’s Place to become a community resource, inspiring and stimulating creativity. Proponents see it as part of the wider cultural regeneration of the town of Wirral.

Upcoming fundraising events are Imaginate, an art and music festival, September 25 in Birkenhead; and Jarvis Cocker in conversation at the Liverpool Playhouse on September 30.

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Shanghai center accepts art from the public for display https://poterefotografico.com/shanghai-center-accepts-art-from-the-public-for-display/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 12:39:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/shanghai-center-accepts-art-from-the-public-for-display/ Ti Gong Do you dream of organizing a solo exhibition but you think it’s just pie in the sky? Just like Situ Lixuan, 9 years old. But in Shanghai, a city where dreams come true, his has come true. Photos taken by the Shanghai student were exhibited to the public as part of a “Citizen […]]]>

Ti Gong

Do you dream of organizing a solo exhibition but you think it’s just pie in the sky?

Just like Situ Lixuan, 9 years old. But in Shanghai, a city where dreams come true, his has come true.

Photos taken by the Shanghai student were exhibited to the public as part of a “Citizen Art Space” project launched by the Jing’an Culture Center in March to create a platform for citizens to showcase their creations.

In other words, any art lover, regardless of age and profession, has the opportunity to present their paintings, photos, installations and other art forms to the public. The project was received with unfailing enthusiasm.

Since March, the center has accepted works from nearly 50 citizens, from preschoolers to retirees, from doctors to freelancers. Situ is one of them.

Shanghai center accepts art from the public for display

Ti Gong

Despite his age, Situ Lixuan is an experienced photographer.

Last month, he held his solo exhibition “Animal World”, inviting the public to get up close to “adorable raccoons, cocky ostriches and energetic flamingos”.

“You see! I managed to capture the moment of the pelican hunting for the fish,” he said of his favorite photo. “I can record anything interesting with my camera and I can show my photos to my classmates and friends. They will idolize me.”

His father and local doctor, Situ Xiaohao, said the project helped build his son’s confidence and bring them closer together.

“We really appreciate it,” he said. “The curators at the center simply let my son’s imagination run wild, which helped him build his own artistic language and inspired me, as a parent, to see my child as an equal and to explore its unnoticed merits.”

Shanghai center accepts art from the public for display

Ti Gong

Photo by fashion blogger and portrait photographer Xiaoshizi.

Fashion blogger and portrait photographer Xiaoshizi hosted an online exhibit about her life during the city’s COVID lockdown this spring.

Posing with vegetables, she captured moments from life in lockdown to inspire people to find beauty in trivialities.

“Save the veggies,” she said. “Common record that does not come easily. At that time, vegetables gave me a great sense of satisfaction. The project creates a platform for me to show my talent.”

Artist Yin Jun’s paintings of the city’s historic roads are currently on display at the center.

Shanghai center accepts art from the public for display

Ti Gong

It presents more than ten of his oil paintings and watercolors which reflect the cultural charm of the city and the great social changes. It will last until September 23.

“The center is located in the heart of Shanghai which is surrounded by so many historic roads and buildings,” he said. “This exhibition is my tribute to Shanghai. I hope to share the beauties of the city with the public.”

A visitor named Chen said he liked the idea of ​​displaying everyday people’s artwork at their doorstep. “It’s like a subtle blend of normal life and elegant art,” he said.

The center hosts more works of art from the public. Anyone interested in the project can send their works to shangspace@163.com.

Shanghai center accepts art from the public for display

Ti Gong

Yin Jun’s exhibition is popular.

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Inauguration of Waterworks ‘Art for All – I am: Identity. Stories. Connections.’ tonight – Salisbury Post https://poterefotografico.com/inauguration-of-waterworks-art-for-all-i-am-identity-stories-connections-tonight-salisbury-post/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 04:00:51 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/inauguration-of-waterworks-art-for-all-i-am-identity-stories-connections-tonight-salisbury-post/ Inauguration of Waterworks ‘Art for All – I am: Identity. Stories. Connections.’ tonight Posted at 12:00 a.m. on Friday, September 16, 2022 SALISBURY — What if every artist in the arts community had the opportunity to have their work exhibited to the public in a professional gallery? This is the challenge that materializes at the […]]]>

Inauguration of Waterworks ‘Art for All – I am: Identity. Stories. Connections.’ tonight

Posted at 12:00 a.m. on Friday, September 16, 2022

SALISBURY — What if every artist in the arts community had the opportunity to have their work exhibited to the public in a professional gallery? This is the challenge that materializes at the Waterworks Visual Arts Center for the fall/winter exhibition “Art for All – I Am: Identity. Stories. Connections.”

The Preview Reception will take place tonight from 5-7 p.m. at 123 E. Liberty St. Patrons and friends of the Visual Arts Center will have the opportunity to meet and visit them as well as view their work at a public reception. No entry is charged and light refreshments will be served.

The exhibition, which features more than 150 works by 55 artists across the five Waterworks galleries, ironically comes after the summer showing an almost equal number of pieces, but drawn or painted by a single artist, Don Moore, who died in last February. . Many of Moore’s pieces were created decades ago, while the new exhibition, the largest collection of artists and their works ever on display at the Center for the Arts, features new creations using a wide range of media.

In January, the call went out for submissions for the juried show, but the question was not just how big the response would be, but also what sort of variety would be offered. It turned out there was nothing to worry about.

“I am thrilled with the diversity of artists who took part in the show,” Waterworks chief executive Anne Scott Clement said in a press release. “The work is incredibly individualized and truly celebrates our goal of bringing together new, emerging and established talent from across the Carolinas to celebrate our unique identifier of personal and cultural stories and connections.”

Many works on display are creations by artists from this region and the surrounding area.

The show runs until February 28. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Walk-ins and self-guided tours are welcome during gallery hours. Groups can arrange a guided tour of the exhibits by calling 704-636-1882 at least two weeks in advance.

Waterworks Visual Arts Center is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums and is one of 12 art museums in the state with this distinction. Waterworks is Rowan County’s only public art center, free to everyone. As the only educational museum within a 40-mile radius, the Center offers art classes for all ages, from toddlers to retirees, and includes mediums as diverse as clay, painting, and even photography. traditional non-digital. More information about Waterworks can be found at www.waterworks.org.

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Art Enriches Life: The Marietta Arts Council https://poterefotografico.com/art-enriches-life-the-marietta-arts-council/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 20:50:04 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/art-enriches-life-the-marietta-arts-council/ By Brian Benfield The Marietta Arts Council is a non-profit volunteer group dedicated to the idea that art, in all its forms, is for everyone and improves our quality of life, expands our minds and uplifts our mood through advocacy , education and public art. My sincere connection to the arts council dates back to […]]]>

By Brian Benfield

The Marietta Arts Council is a non-profit volunteer group dedicated to the idea that art, in all its forms, is for everyone and improves our quality of life, expands our minds and uplifts our mood through advocacy , education and public art. My sincere connection to the arts council dates back to 2018 when my wife and I were looking to buy a house within walking distance of Marietta Square. We knew the Mountain to River Trailfest was along the Lewis Park walking trail, going south through the plaza and ending in Brown Park next to the Confederate Cemetery. It was the inaugural year, and it is a public art exhibit with several hundred large ornate weatherproof panels on the closing gallery along the trail. These original pieces include photographs, paintings, drawings and an impressive student section. The Closing Gallery travels through Cobb County after its debut in Marietta, with each town hosting its own installation. Plus, live music and dance performances along the route and sculptures created by local artisans are on display for all to enjoy.

We went to Lewis Park on Campbell Hill Street and noticed the kids smiling on the swings while their families were busy packing a picnic as we walked along the sidewalk. A few steps further, we found a house for sale and renovation, about ninety percent complete. My wife rushed into the house like she knew it was the one. I saw the real estate sign and dialed the number. She came back to the big porch of the little house, waving her hands wildly and told me to “hang up the phone, come in and take a look!” I dropped the phone from my ear and said, “I’m talking to the real estate agent.” I also knew. We ended up buying this house built in 1918 and have had a love affair with the M2R (Mountain to River) Trailfest ever since.

Bonnie Reavis wears an abundant amount of hats in the Marietta community. She owns The Brickyard, a unique event space that hosts weddings and parties of all sizes. Reavis is a partner of The Loft Art Gallery which curates, exhibits and markets art from the neighborhood and around the world. She is also the president of the Marietta Arts Council and leads the city’s negotiations to get approval for the vast array of dazzling murals that are on display in the city, among myriad other tasks. I met Bonnie in 2015 when she came on our food tour and then exclaimed, “Wow, I thought I knew a lot about the Marietta food scene, but I’m correcting myself.” She is a gentle woman who strongly believes that art, theater and cuisine are all woven into the fabric of our humanity and can change the way you think and feel about a place, a neighborhood or an entire community.

The Marietta Arts Council is hosting an event September 15 from 5-7 p.m. at the Atlanta Cider Company to learn more about how anyone can get involved in shaping the future and help create a vision of what is to come for the twenty-three square miles which is the town of Marietta proper. This event will be a meet-and-greet event to get to know the board members and how you can help by providing “human capital,” as Bonnie describes it. Or if you are an artist or looking to be a sponsor to help their cause, then you want to attend this little party.

When my wife and I are walking to Marietta Square to catch a live performance at the Strand Theatre, we stop to gaze at one of the many massive and vivid murals, and we see a small child walking towards his class. dance at the Georgia Dance Conservatory, our hearts and souls are full because we live in a city that fully embraces the arts. And they enrich us in a million different ways. It’s hard to express as a writer, but sometimes words can’t describe it. You just feel it.

www.mariettaartscouncil.com

www.m2rfence.com

Brian Benefield is a Dekalb County-born Atlanta native who has lived in Cobb since 2003.

He has worked in hospitality, marketing, real estate and more recently food tourism.

Married to Cecilie Benefield for 12 happy years.

They have a dog, Miss Pickles.

Hobbies are mountain biking, running, gardening and trying new recipes in the kitchen

Member of Les Marmitions cooking club since 2016, where we cook 5-course meals with local Atlanta chefs.

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Art Center Sarasota announces 2022-2023 exhibition season https://poterefotografico.com/art-center-sarasota-announces-2022-2023-exhibition-season/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 04:07:30 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/art-center-sarasota-announces-2022-2023-exhibition-season/ Arts & Culture DAILY SRQ MONDAY BUSINESS EDITION MONDAY SEPTEMBER 12, 2022 | The Art Center Sarasota’s 2022-23 exhibition season considers both the big picture and the small picture. Some of the featured artists explore global issues and seismic shifts in history. Others open the viewer’s eyes to the triumphs and struggles of unique individuals. […]]]>

Arts & Culture


The Art Center Sarasota’s 2022-23 exhibition season considers both the big picture and the small picture. Some of the featured artists explore global issues and seismic shifts in history. Others open the viewer’s eyes to the triumphs and struggles of unique individuals. In the upcoming season, Art Center Sarasota celebrates their entire artistic vision. These diverse offerings include both solo exhibitions devoted to the deeply personal expressions of individual artists and group exhibitions organized by jurors of stature in the regional artistic landscape. The 2022-2023 season features exciting works that span the gamut of artistic mediums, from abstract ceramic sculpture to documentary photography. According to Kinsey Robb, Executive Director of the Art Center Sarasota, this tapestry of artistic expression reflects ACS’s larger mission. “We are a community arts center,” she says. “The community we serve is incredibly diverse. We honor this diversity with our selection of art and artists. Robb adds that she is thrilled to present an Artist Talk Series this season, a program that “offers audiences the opportunity to delve deeper into the minds of our artists in an intimate, friendly setting.”

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Three Lessons in Art on Paper https://poterefotografico.com/three-lessons-in-art-on-paper/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 21:07:41 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/three-lessons-in-art-on-paper/ Anyone who wants to learn anything about art will agree that convention centers are terrible sites for its display. Yet our current art market insists on such shoddy places, convinced that the next great finds will be buried in such bazaar surroundings. Under these circumstances, I find myself at the entrance to Pier 36 – […]]]>

Anyone who wants to learn anything about art will agree that convention centers are terrible sites for its display. Yet our current art market insists on such shoddy places, convinced that the next great finds will be buried in such bazaar surroundings. Under these circumstances, I find myself at the entrance to Pier 36 – a 70,000 square foot facility that also hosts Seltzerland, “the nation’s premier hard seltzer festival”; K-Expo, “a celebration of all things Korean pop culture”; and the Sneaker Exit, “the ultimate sneaker trade show” – to cover Art on Paper, a fair that claims to showcase the preeminent modern and contemporary artists working on paper.

As I enter, I brace myself for the worst: the din of cocktail chatter increased tenfold in the cavernous pit; the vacant and warlike gaze of merchants in costume; left outfits I never would have worn in a million years that still make me want to evaporate. For my own sanity, I set myself a simple task for the evening: learn something new on paper. I admit there is something redeeming about paper as a medium – and a fair that is faithful to it.

Bang Geul Han’s “Warp and Weft #05” is a monumental piece about the entanglements of class, race, and reproductive rights in the United States.

A preliminary study of the fair gives me my first glimpse, that shared by several murmuring carnies huddled not inside the stands but in the central aisles. The most eye-catching and surprising pieces at first glance are sculptural. A tapestry woven assiduously with long strips of shredded paper drapes like a huge roll of gauze from the ceiling. Entitled “Warp and Weft #05” – a reference to the vertical and horizontal weaving technique that turns yarn into fabric – each strip is inscribed with words from 1980s and 90s crime and welfare bills or crime-limiting bills access to abortion. The paper tapestry is complemented by a series of photographs that artist Bang Geul Han has staged in daily life by wearing it in various unexpected ways (i.e. reading with the bamboo mat-like object covering her eyes). Not far from Han’s room is a white sundress arrangement of labyrinthine cutouts hanging perpendicularly. The labyrinth-like pattern on each two-dimensional sheet , superimposed on each other and taken together, produces the illusion of an infinite recession in three.

Each strip of paper is inscribed with words from state and federal law.

“Three-dimensional works are particularly fascinating. Paper is two-dimensional, but turning it into three-dimensional takes it to another level,” a man named Jeff, who wears a Hawaiian shirt and a Target reusable tote bag, tells me.

The most impressive to me of the sculptural works is “Entropy: Macrostates & Microstates” by Shanthi Chandrasekar. Near the top of the hanging piece are a set of large circular discs populated with holes of varying sizes. Suspended from these discs are smaller discs made from the drilled holes – and the discs suspended from them then iterate accordingly.

Chandrasekar, who did not formally study art but studied physics and psychology, says that from an early age she was drawn to the everyday delights of punching. “I loved the remaining negative space,” she explains.

“Entropy: Macrostates & Microstates” by Shanthi Chandrasekar is an exploration of the artist’s love for paper and hole punches.

“The more I worked, the more I understood the medium, in terms of not using a pencil or anything other than a piece of paper and a hole punch. I loved every piece of paper I punched,” she says, associating her process and the finished product to entropy. Carefully guarding every piece of paper she punched, she says, “is entropy on different levels; change that happens. It’s the disintegration of a sheet of paper, which dissipates energy. As I follow this dissipation down to the ground, I notice the infinitesimal piles of debris at our feet. “It all comes down to this. After that, you can’t go any further,” laughs Chandrasekar.

“It’s also a remnant of my childhood – growing up by the sea, coming to this country, and the snow, the rain, the leaves,” she says. As an aside, she adds that she wasn’t too strict with herself about calculating the number of holes in each disc, but that “prime numbers” tend to “go wild”. The enjoyment of complexity in a familiar medium that many of us only engage with haphazardly and instrumentally is essential to the sculptural enjoyment (and consequent creative urge) of these works.

Dave Eggers’ posters contain depressing and disturbing words, but visitors were nonetheless charmed and cheerful.

Shortly after, I find myself surrounded by posters of Dave Eggers in a surprisingly immersive and satisfying booth set up by the San Francisco Electric Works gallery. Noah Lang, owner of Electric Works, was initially skeptical when Eggers approached him with his designs.

“I’ve seen drawings of famous people doing other things,” he says before pausing. But upon seeing Eggers’ visual works, Lang found them “beautiful” and “amazing.” Although many of the posters contain disturbing and depressive messages, the viewers who stream in seem largely charmed and humorous. I tell a smiling woman taking pictures that she looks happy.

“That describes my feelings exactly,” she replies. “It’s very accessible, which I really like.” She says that while she also enjoys abstract work, “the value proposition is much more evident” with works like these. “The humor is very close to the absurd, à la Douglas Adams”, she continues. She adds that she loves “the color palette, the animals and the animals saying nonsense things.” A second lesson, which serves as the inverse of the first, arrives: paper is all about ease, comfort and accessibility, and it is gratifying that art on paper embodies these values.

Along with new contributions to the show are more of the same.

I take the time to wander around the fair making reviews. There are a lot of “fresh” things, as Jeff puts it, but there are also a lot of similarities, as a disgruntled man who looks hopelessly bored and stands in line for a drink tells me. (At the start of the line, we find out that drink tokens are required. On my way out, I catch up with him again near the bar, still looking dour. “Make sure you write about how we have to pay the refreshments,” he said sternly, apparently struggling to get through the night.)

Many works feature color combinations that could be considered “vibrant” in dark, transient spaces like airports and, indeed, convention centers. That’s fine, of course, but given their so-called dynamism, they have a remarkable ability to blend into their mundane surroundings. Fifteen minutes before closing, I embark on a wild goose hunt to document all the non-inventive works done on the dollar bills, but it’s a mad rush: I can’t remember where the kiosks are.

A pile of yellowed tracts bound together with string gave the author the third and final lesson on the paper of the night.

It was then that Art on Paper offered me a third and final lesson. Out of the corner of my eye, hidden in a corner of the Pan American Projects booth, I see a large vertical pile of yellowed papers tied together with string. It’s by José Manuel Fors, a Cuban artist concerned with accumulation, memory and loss. I am a textual person, so this piece – with its fragility, integrity and volumetry – immediately evokes me. These articles contain an essential truth about the dignity and futility of rescuing memory from obscurity. Paper is its own demise and the value of persisting nonetheless. I let go of my anxieties about tracking down all the bad money art – a meaningless endeavor, I see now – and leave the fair satisfied that an event at Pier 36, of all the places, gave me these lessons.

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Scholastic Art & Writing Awards open for entries as program celebrates 100 years of recognizing nation’s creative teens https://poterefotografico.com/scholastic-art-writing-awards-open-for-entries-as-program-celebrates-100-years-of-recognizing-nations-creative-teens/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 13:01:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/scholastic-art-writing-awards-open-for-entries-as-program-celebrates-100-years-of-recognizing-nations-creative-teens/ To learn more about the 2023 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, or to submit work in one of the program’s 28 categories, visit: artandwriting.org For the past 100 years, the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards has been a space for teens to push boundaries and make waves with their creative pursuits. The program has served […]]]>

To learn more about the 2023 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, or to submit work in one of the program’s 28 categories, visit: artandwriting.org

For the past 100 years, the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards has been a space for teens to push boundaries and make waves with their creative pursuits. The program has served as a launch pad for generations of artists, writers and professionals in a wide variety of industries, with many luminaries attributing their confidence to further their careers to the awards. Since their inception, the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards have nurtured the passions, talents, and perspectives of millions of teens, validating their creative abilities and the belief that their voice matters.

“Since 1923, the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards have supported the artistic endeavors of adolescents and provided a space for young creatives to express themselves and contribute their voices and ideas to a larger conversation. original writing that we have recognized over the past 100 years has not only been inspirational and thought-provoking, but together reflect our country’s history, culture, struggles and achievements.As we enter our second century, our mission has never been more vital, and I look forward to seeing what a new generation of young artists and writers share with us through the awards,” said Christophe Wisniewskiexecutive director of the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers, the nonprofit administrator of the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards.

To launch the 100e year of recognition for the nation’s creative teens, the Alliance is thrilled to announce that global bestselling author and award-winning illustrator David Pilkey (Dog Man, Cat Kid Comic Club, Captain Underpants) will underwrite the scholarships of 12 high school students for their outstanding portfolios – two Gold Medal Portfolio Award scholarships worth $12,500 each as well as 10 Silver Medal with Distinction Portfolio Award Scholarships worth $2,000 each. As part of The David Pilkey Awards which add up to nearly $50,000the educator of each recognized student will also receive $1,000 for each of the two Gold Medal Portfolio Awards and $250 for each educator of the recipients of the Silver Medal with Distinction Portfolio Award.

As a young adult, David Pilkey, whose teacher encouraged him to illustrate and write books, won a national competition that led to the publication of his first picture book. He went on to do many acclaimed children’s books before receiving a Caldecott Honor. To learn more, visit http://mediaroom.scholastic.com/davpilkey.

The Dav Pilkey Awards add to a long list of new and already established scholarships and sponsored awards. Each year, the Alliance partners with individuals, foundations, and corporations to provide scholarship opportunities for students in certain categories or on particular themes.

The 2023 scholarships and cash awards include:

  • *NEW* The Flaunt It Award: Developed in conjunction with Don’t Hide It, Flaunt It (DHIFI, Inc.), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization working to advance acceptance, tolerance, and mutual respect for visible differences or invisible to people. The prize, underwritten by Don’t Hide It, Flaunt It, RBC Foundation UNITED STATESand Morgan Stanley, rewards teens who look or feel different and who reflect and share their experiences (whether challenging, accepting or celebrating) about what makes them unique.
    • The Flaunt It prize includes two $1,000 scholarships (one for art and one for writing) for teens whose outstanding work explores DHIFI’s theme: “Things that make me different make me, me.”
  • *UPDATE* Portfolio Awards: The program’s highest national honour, 16 Gold Portfolio Award winners will now receive $12,500 scholarships for their writing or art portfolio, an increase of $10,000 before, and their educators will receive $1,000 price; 24 Silver Medal with Distinction Portfolio Award recipients will now receive $2,000 scholarships, an increase of $1,000 previously, their educators receiving $250 price.
  • The Herblock prize for editorial design: Sponsored by The Herb Block Foundation, this prize offers three young artists $1,000 scholarships for the visual arts that offer commentary on current events, social happenings, or political topics, and their educators with $250 price.
  • New York Life Awards: Guaranteed by the New York Life Foundation, this prize recognizes six students at the national level with $1,000 scholarships for their work exploring personal grief, loss, and bereavement, and their educators with $250 price. Additional $500 scholarships are also available for two students from each of the following states: California, Nevada, New Jersey, Ohio, Tennesseeand Texas.
  • Alliance/ACT-SO Path Award: In partnership with the NAACP’s Afro-Academic, Cultural, Technological, and Scientific Olympics (ACT-SO), this award provides full scholarships to attend summer art or writing programs for a maximum of ten ACT-SO Fellows, who also receive gold or silver. Key regional awards.

Students aged 13 and over residing in United StatesUS territories and military bases, or Canada are invited to submit original works in one of the 28 art and writing categories of the awards, including drawing and illustration, photography, flash fiction, poetry, film and animation and journalism. All works are selected for prizes based on their originality, skill and the emergence of a personal vision or voice and without knowledge of name, gender, age, origin ethnicity or hometown of the student. Works are first reviewed regionally by over 100 local Alliance affiliates, and those awarded Gold Keys are then judged nationally by an impressive panel of industry experts. Registration fees are $10 for individual registrations and $30 for wallets. Fees may be waived for any potential participant for whom fees constitute a barrier to entry. Fee waivers are made possible, in part, by BLICK Art Materials.

Application deadlines vary by region. The 2023 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards National Medalists will be announced in March 2023, and throughout the spring, the Alliance will host a series of virtual and in-person celebrations for students, families, and educators, culminating in the summer launch of the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards Traveling Exhibit, a traveling public exhibition featuring some 2023 National Medalists’ works. Recipients may have their work published in anthologies featuring stories, essays, and poetry by teenage authors and highlighting paintings, photographs, drawings, and other works by teenage artists. For pricing details, visit www.artandwriting.org.

About the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards

Founded in 1923, the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards are presented by the nonprofit 501(c)(3) Alliance for Young Artists & Writers, and are made possible through the generosity of Scholastic Inc., New York Life Foundation, The Maurice R. Robinson Fund, Bloomberg Philanthropies, Command Companies, The Herb Block Foundation, The Jay Pritzker Foundation, Quad and The Windhover Foundation, BLICK Art Materials, National Endowment for the Arts, The New York Times, Don’t Hide It, Flaunt It, RBC Foundation USA, Morgan Stanley, AppleTV+, Lindenmeyr Book Publishing Papers, Garcia Family Foundation, New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and many other individual, foundation and corporate donors; and, for the National Student Poets Program, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the Hearthland Foundation, the Poetry Foundation, and the Academy of American Poets.

For more information on the Alliance for Young Artists and Writers, visit www.artandwriting.org. Additional pricing details can be found in Scholastic’s media room: http://mediaroom.scholastic.com/artandwriting.

SOURCE Alliance for Young Artists and Writers

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Saint Francis University students master the art of self-portraiture | Schools https://poterefotografico.com/saint-francis-university-students-master-the-art-of-self-portraiture-schools/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 04:15:00 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/saint-francis-university-students-master-the-art-of-self-portraiture-schools/ As Callie Swangin created her self-portrait for an art class at the University of Saint Francis, she was aware of a variable irrelevant to her peers using pencil, charcoal and ballpoint pen – the timer of her camera. There was “a lot of being in the wrong place every time it happened,” said Swangin, a […]]]>

As Callie Swangin created her self-portrait for an art class at the University of Saint Francis, she was aware of a variable irrelevant to her peers using pencil, charcoal and ballpoint pen – the timer of her camera.

There was “a lot of being in the wrong place every time it happened,” said Swangin, a junior animation student.

Her self-portrait is among dozens on display at the Mimi and Ian Rolland Art and Visual Communication Center in an exhibition featuring renowned American artist Jim Dine. The exhibition includes some of his self-portraits, which show the evolution of his artistic process and how he interpreted his age.

“He revisits this theme quite regularly,” said gallery director Justin Johnson.

Students in the studio art program were instructed to do the same. By revisiting the self-portrait, Johnson said, a psychological connection is created between an artist and their likeness over time.

The pupils’ self-portraits – examples in drawing, painting, photography and engraving – mainly focus on their faces. Johnson said it’s a common approach because facial features are more intimate.

As Johnson showed the students’ works, he noted the female lines used in one self-portrait and the male lines used in another. Some self-portraits become abstract while others show only part of the face.

Art education student Morgan Thoma opted for a simplistic setup – a light, a mirror and a camera – to capture both her back and her face. She changed the image to monochrome using computer software.

“I had a lot of fun,” Thoma said, noting the hours spent in the campus studio.

The Dine, “Vocabulary of Metaphors” exhibit runs through October 23 at the Center for Art and Visual Communication on Leesburg Road, on the southeast side of campus, 2701 Spring St. The opening hours of the gallery are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday. It is closed today.

“It’s pretty amazing how we have such an established artist here,” Thoma said.

On Saturday, the public can attend the President’s Art Gala, an evening celebrating Dine’s work. The free event will run from 6-9 p.m. and will include music, appetizers and a cash bar. Johnson will highlight the major works of the exhibition during a talk at 5:30 p.m.

Andria Derstine of the Allen Memorial Art Museum at Oberlin College will present a talk on Dine’s artistic practice at 6 p.m. September 28 at North Campus Auditorium, 2702 Spring St.

asloboda@jg.net

Competition

The Sons of the American Revolution and the General Mad Anthony Wayne organization are partnering to award cash prizes at the local, state, and national levels for essays on the importance of teaching about the American Revolution era. The contest is open to public, private, and parochial elementary, middle, and high school teachers in the Fort Wayne area. The first place winner will receive $200 for a local win, $1,000 for a state win and $5,000 for a national win. There will be cash prizes of $5,000 for each national winning teacher at the elementary, middle or high school levels. Each winner will participate in a summer seminar for graduates.

In another partnership, the groups are seeking original orations from Fort Wayne high school students about a Revolutionary War event, person, or document, with a focus on the 250th anniversary of the nation. Speeches should be between 5 and 6 minutes long and delivered in front of an audience without the use of notes or props. The first place winner will receive $200 for a local win, $1,000 for a state win and $8,000 for a national win. The second place national winner will receive $5,000 and the third place winner will win $3,000. Applicants must be in ninth grade.

For both contests, contact Jim Hamilton at jdhvlh@aol.com or 260-409-9937 for an application. The deadline is 5 p.m. on November 1.

FWCS

Study Connection celebrated its 34th year of student aid with its annual Celebration and Appreciation Breakfast on August 25th. Study Connection began in 1989, founded by Don Wolf, retired CEO and Chairman Emeritus of Do it Best Corp. one with Fort Wayne Community School students in need of academic assistance. The pairs meet every week after school for an hour during the school year, with most students bused to and from local businesses for tutoring sessions. This gives students the chance to receive extra help with homework and to meet a mentor in the community and learn about local career opportunities. Call 260-467-8811 or email communityprograms@fwcs.k12.in.us to get involved or learn more about Study Connection.

Last month, the FWCS Board of Trustees approved Jeff King as principal of Miami Middle School. King retired from the district in 2019 with 34 years of education, but almost immediately returned as an alternate trustee. In Miami, he replaces Rena Clemons, now deputy director of Kekionga Middle School.

freedom academy

Freedom Academy is looking for instructors for advanced manufacturing, healthcare, and professional development courses. Instructors have the flexibility to choose the classes that best fit their schedules. Classes are held in person Monday through Thursday and typically last eight to 15 weeks. The curriculum, books, supplies, and instructions are provided to instructors, and they are encouraged to add their insights and experiences. Classes are held at Career Tech Educational facilities, Angola Training Center, Community Learning Center and other locations in Allen, Adams, DeKalb, Huntington, Noble, Kosciusko, LaGrange, Steuben, Wabash counties , Wells and Whitley. Go to www.freedomacademy.net/instructors for information.

Grace






Students and faculty at Bethel University School of Nursing have partnered with the Hooghan Nizhoni Church of God in Gamerco, New Mexico, to conduct blood pressure tests and provide education about choices healthy lifestyles.




Bethel University School of Nursing at Grace College sent students and faculty to Gamerco, New Mexico, for a week this summer to serve the Navajo Nation, a disproportionately impoverished and medically underserved region. The group has partnered with local churches to conduct blood pressure screenings and provide education on healthy lifestyle choices.

Acknowledgement

Fort Wayne’s Edward Sun was among 10 winners of the Young Hero Awards presented by the National Liberty Museum in Philadelphia and TD Bank. The honor recognizes young people who have taken action to bring about positive social change in their schools and communities. Sun was recognized for using his love of music to found Second Strings, a charitable project committed to keeping the music community together by recycling, reusing and saving musical equipment. Second Strings donated over $10,000 in strings collected throughout the Midwest and Canada.

Scholarships

TE Incorporated, a local contracting/engineering company, awarded a scholarship for the fall semester to Lydia Myers, a young business student with a minor in psychology at Indiana University East. The TE scholarship is awarded to dependents of full-time employees.

The University of Saint Francis Busse/Fabini Cougar Classic golf outing raised $75,000 for student-athlete scholarships.

trine







mark the music

Music


Trine’s Board of Directors elected Mark Music, President and CEO of Ruoff Mortgage, from among its members.

Trine University is accepting applications for the RN-to-BSN program for the 2022-23 cycle. Prospective students can apply through the NursingCAS website, www.nursingcas.org. The program is designed to meet the needs of working registered nurses with the online format allowing them to complete a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree on their own schedule and at their own pace. Each course lasts eight weeks or six weeks during the summer terms. Go to www.trine.edu/bsn for information.







Trine Book Fair

A community member looks at available books at Trine University’s annual Book Night event in 2018. The university’s Institute of Humanities is collecting gently used books for this year’s event until September 15.




Trine’s Humanities Institute is collecting gently used books until September 15 for its annual Book Night event. Collection sites in Angola are Caleo Cafe, Elemento, Angola City Hall, Calvary Lutheran Church, First Congregational United Church of Christ, and Taylor Hall on the university campus. Book Night will take place from 4-8 p.m. on October 13 at the T. Furth Performing Arts Center in Trine. Anyone who participates can take away the donated books free of charge.

Students and parents who have a favorite teacher can nominate the individual to Teacher Honor Roll. Send applications to The Journal Gazette, 600 W. Main St., Fort Wayne, IN 46802; fax 461-8893 or email asloboda@jg.net.

To submit an item, send a typed release from the school or organization to education workbook, The Journal Gazette, 600 W. Main St., Fort Wayne, IN 46802; fax 461-8893 or email asloboda@jg.net at least two weeks before the desired publication date.

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Downtown Art Challenge brings Clarence Rundell’s legacy to the streets of Kalispell https://poterefotografico.com/downtown-art-challenge-brings-clarence-rundells-legacy-to-the-streets-of-kalispell/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 11:57:55 +0000 https://poterefotografico.com/downtown-art-challenge-brings-clarence-rundells-legacy-to-the-streets-of-kalispell/ Late Saturday afternoon, General Delorme moved to Wheat Montana’s drive-thru so she could continue painting unhindered by the rain. It was just one of many adjustments Delorme made throughout the day to his normal process. For starters, she was painting faster than she normally would. The trees she had painted along the shore of Flathead […]]]>

Late Saturday afternoon, General Delorme moved to Wheat Montana’s drive-thru so she could continue painting unhindered by the rain. It was just one of many adjustments Delorme made throughout the day to his normal process.

For starters, she was painting faster than she normally would. The trees she had painted along the shore of Flathead Lake and the fine detail they required could usually take her a day, but Delorme didn’t have one. As a participant in the Downtown Kalispell Art Challenge, she only had 10 hours.

The Art Challenge brought together 10 local artists who positioned themselves around downtown Kalispell and were given 10 hours to complete a painting inspired by one of Kalispell artist Clarence Rundell’s regional landscape paintings. The time limit is a nod to how fast Rundell would have worked. Posters displaying QR codes at each artist’s painting location allowed people to place bids on the artwork. By August 29, the combined bid for the 10 paintings had reached $4,711. Art auctions close at 7:30 p.m. on September 9.

The fundraiser was organized by the Kalispell Downtown Association and the KALICO Art Center. Participating artists include Tessa Heck, Alyssa Shaw, Gen Delorme, Haakon Ensign, Kenneth Yarus, Kerry Broughton, Susan Guthrie, Madison Apple, Tanya Lambrecht and Marshall Noice. Each performer was stationed at a different location downtown, including Alchemy Lounge, Bias Brewing, Brannigan’s Irish Pub, the KALICO parking lot, MontaVino Winery, Nature Baby Outfitters, Wheat Montana, Sweet Peaks Ice Cream, and the SunRift Beer Company brewery.

Rundell’s name is one that has seen a resurgence in recent months. A painter who lived in the Flathead Valley for decades, Rundell died in 1984 at Columbia Falls Veterans Home. Among his surviving works in the city are a series of murals depicting scenes from Glacier National Park. The murals were painted directly on plaster in what is now the Rocky Mountain Outfitter Building, but was once the Eagle Shoe Store in Kalispell.

The paintings are 86 years old and are based on photographs by Great Northern Railroad photographer TJ Hileman. Rundell’s murals at Rocky Mountain Outfitter include Lake McDonald, Upper Two Medicine Lake, Josephine Lake, Upper St. Mary Lake, Scarface Point, Janet Lake, Trick Falls, and Upper Kintla Lake.

Glacier National Park murals painted on walls in 1936 by artist Clarence Rundell still adorn Rocky Mountain Outfitter in Kalispell on February 25, 2022. Hunter D’Antuono | flathead beacon

Bruce Guthrie, a sales associate at Rocky Mountain Outfitter, was looking for ways to draw attention to the murals, which customers typically miss when browsing the store’s outdoor gear and supply offerings. Eventually he came up with the idea of ​​creating postcards that the store could sell and also use to give a little more recognition to the work. The postcards hit shelves last March and they’ve been effective conversation starters. Guthrie said that eventually the idea came to having 10 artists do a version of what Rundell himself had done. Guthrie pitched the idea to KALICO executive director Jemina Watstein, who helped secure a Montana Arts Council grant, and Kalispell Downtown Association executive director Pam Carbonari.

“You can take out 10 artists and have them do something in a day, but you associate him with the origin of this, this guy in 1936 at 30 came and did this, and 86 years later it inspires this event, it’s a fun thing. It’s kind of neat to get to know your city,” Guthrie said.

Part of Rundell’s story that inspired the challenge and caught the attention of locals involves how he painted each of the RMO scenes in a day.

“I think it kind of invited people into all of the businesses,” RMO owner Jandy Cox said. “And you can go BS with Marshall, or go up and meet Ken Yarus. They are all delicious.

Taking a break from his Heaven’s Peak oil painting outside of Sweet Peaks, artist and Montana Modern Fine Art gallery owner Marshall Noice said a lot of people stopped by, many of them being curious about the easel he uses for his oils, which is a glass slate placed on a table. Noice said he used the same piece of glass year-round, then changed to a new one every year on January 31, his birthday.

“I wanted to paint a picture that was somewhat similar to the originals,” Noice said, adding that Heaven’s Peak is a familiar landscape to him because of the 13 summers he spent teaching Glacier workshops for the Glacier Institute. He said he usually paints more abstract works, but the departure from his normal approach was nice.

“It’s fun for me to paint something that a lot of people looking at the painting will be able to recognize and see if my interpretation is close to their memory of that place.”

Noice, Delorme and other performers were all visited on Saturday by a group of Clarence Rundell’s family and loved ones, including former Kalispell mayor Doug Rauthe.

“They were telling me how he would give them paintings for birthdays and anniversaries and things like that,” Delorme said. “Their memories of him are works of art. It’s super cool. I want to be remembered like this, with people who have my artwork.

Rundell was Rauthe’s great-uncle, and the former mayor says he has fond memories of the man behind the artwork, who he says was close to his mother who was Rundell’s niece . Rauthe said Rundell was always generous in allowing the children of the family to watch him paint in his apartment, often making them a glass of Kool-Aid to sip on while they watched. He frequently came to Rauthe’s for dinner, often showing up before dinner to say hello. When Rauthe’s mother asked him to stay, the typical response was “Well, I’m not hungry but I’ll eat so I don’t get any.”

Some family members traveled from Olympia, Washington to attend the Art Challenge, but most of the surviving Rundell relatives who participated continue to live in the Flathead Valley. Rundell’s descendants continue to own paintings he left to the family, and Rauthe said the work was considered a “treasure” to his loved ones.

“It was awesome, it was such an honor for him. I just wish he was alive when it happened,” Rauthe said upon seeing the art challenge inspired by his relative.

“It was the thrill of a lifetime for all of us, great-nieces and nephews, as well as my wife. She knew him for about 15 years before he passed away,” Rauthe said. “We’ve always admired his ability to take scenes we knew and bring them to life.”

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